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Diversity Matters

Jun 17, 2017

This is the Manager’s Minute.

In today’s interconnected world, diversity and inclusion are becoming increasingly essential to every healthy organization.

Understanding racial, ethnic, gender and religious issues is an important skill for everyone in the workplace, especially those in management and leadership positions.

Recently, I attended the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity, commonly called NCORE, sponsored by the University of Oklahoma Outreach.

Students listen during a class titled “Land and Lease” at Oklahoma City University’s School of Law in downtown Oklahoma City Monday.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

It’s been nearly 70 years since Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher made history when she became the first African American law student at the University of Oklahoma. Today, there are still few African Americans at law firms.

The Journal Record’s Sarah Terry Cobo writes Sipuel Fisher was a pioneer who challenged segregation.

Chemistry Professor & Head of Open Chemistry Collaborative in Diversity Equity (OXIDE) Rigoberto Hernandez
Paige Willett Lough / KGOU

In an article for Scientific American, author Katherine W. Phillips suggests that diversity in the workplace can enhance creativity, encourage discovery and lead to innovation. According to Rigoberto Hernandez, those assets may be most important in the scientific community.

 

Protests at the University of Missouri and other college campuses are forcing universities into uncomfortable discussions about race and diversity. One school got a head start.

Earlier this year, the University of Oklahoma came under intense pressure when a video showed two members of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity singing a racist chant.

Now, students are comparing the reaction of their university with the recent controversies at Mizzou.

Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

The University of Oklahoma's new chief of diversity programs says he's right for the job after a racist video roiled the school last month.

Jabar Shumate says he was discriminated against while attending there in the 1990s.

The black former state senator remembers the fliers with his picture on them tacked up during his campaign for student body vice president: "Do you want this person living in your house? Vote the other ticket."

OU President David Boren tapped the Tulsa Democrat for the newly created vice president in charge of overseeing diversity programs.

Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

The University of Oklahoma announced it’s new vice president for diversity Tuesday. Former state lawmaker Jabar Shumate will be in charge of boosting OU’s low multicultural numbers at both the faculty and student level. OU is the last Big 12 school to add a high-level diversity position.

University of Oklahoma President David Boren announces the appointment of Jabar Shumate as OU's new Vice President for the University Community during a March 31 press conference.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

University of Oklahoma President David Boren has named former state Senator and Representative Jabar Shumate as OU's Vice President for the University, a newly created role that will focus on diversity and outreach.

"I knew that this person had to be someone in whom I had complete trust. Complete trust in their actions, complete trust in their motives, complete trust in their good judgment," Boren said during a Tuesday press conference. 

University of Oklahoma President David Boren during Monday's press conference in Holmberg Hall addressing the racist video.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

President Barack Obama says he was "heartened" by the University of Oklahoma's swift response after video surfaced of fraternity brothers chanting about lynching.

Two students who had participated were immediately expelled.

Obama says what happened there won't be the last time a fraternity member does something stupid but that what's different from 30 or 40 years ago is the reaction.

Back then, Obama says, there might have been more tolerance for that type of chant.

Diversity Concerns Linger On University Of Oklahoma Campus

Mar 17, 2015
Demonstrators gather outside Evans Hall on the University of Oklahoma campus Monday morning to protest the video with racist chants allegedly by Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity members.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

In the days after a racially charged video circulated on social media and gained national attention, minority students at the University of Oklahoma spoke out, many expressing concerns about their experiences on campus.

The leaked video shows Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity members chanting that African American males would never be allowed in their organization. It was blatantly racist, and emotions ran high with students and faculty at the university.

Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Too few peers in the classroom. A lack of minority professors. Insensitive jokes. These were a few of the issues raised at a race and diversity town hall forum on Wednesday night at the University of Oklahoma in Norman. The forum was hosted by Unheard and the Price College of Business.