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drug cartels

In this July 2, 2017 photo, Veracruz state police patrol along the waterfront boulevard in Coatzacoalcos, Mexico.
Rebecca Blackwell / AP

The recent surge of violence in Mexico is due to greater competition for territory between drug cartels, according to a University of Oklahoma political scientist.

Charles Kenney told KGOU’s World Views the Mexican government’s war on drug cartels weakened some drug cartels, but others have stepped up to fill the void,  creating violence.

Former Mexican Ambassador: More Cooperation Needed, Not Less

Dec 1, 2017
Former Mexican Ambassador to the U.S., Arturo Sarukhan Casamitjana, pauses before answering question during his interview with the Associated Press in Washington, Monday, Jan. 26, 2009.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

The United States and Mexico have a daily economic impact on each other, but citizens of both countries often don’t grasp the importance of the U.S.-Mexico relationship and how necessary cooperation is, according to a former Mexican ambassador.

Matt Trotter / KWGS

Federal authorities say Tulsa gang members have distributed $10 million worth of cocaine from Mexican cartels and murdered at least one witness since 2011.

A federal indictment states more than 50 members and associates of the Hoover Crips have been charged with a total of about 240 criminal offenses. Authorities released the findings of the three-year, multi-agency investigation on Tuesday.

This story was updated at 4:20 p.m. ET.

The head of Mexico's Sinaloa drug cartel, Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, was captured overnight by U.S. and Mexican officials in the Pacific coastal town of Mazatlan.

World Views: December 6, 2013

Dec 6, 2013

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss China 's move to grab airspace over the East China Sea, and ongoing protests in Ukraine over a jailed political leader, and a scuttled trade pact with the European Union.

The Dallas Morning News Mexico Bureau Chief Alfredo Corchado joins Grillot to talk about his 20-year career. His memoir Midnight in Mexico chronicles his coverage of the country’s war against the drug cartels.

Reporter and author Alfredo Corchado covers a political rally in the border city of Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, in 1986.
Billy Calzada

Alfredo Corchado has spent nearly 20 years covering his native country as the Mexico bureau chief for The Dallas Morning News.

From first reporting on government protests in Ciudad Juárez in the mid-80s, through five presidential administrations and a violent drug war with no end in sight, he says he’s always left with the fact that it’s not enough.