Pregnant women who use drugs could face criminal penalties under a measure working its way through the Oklahoma Senate.

SB 559 would change the definition of assault to include the illegal use of a narcotic drug by a child's mother while the mother is pregnant. A woman found guilty would face a misdemeanor charge, possibly 30 days in jail and a $500 fine.

  However, if the child dies as a result of the drug use, the assault would be considered a felony and the woman would face a prison sentence of not more than five years and a $500 fine.

baby toes
sabianmaggy / Flickr Creative Commons

The Oklahoma Department of Human Services says hospitals in the state are reporting an increasing number of newborns who tested positive for drugs or alcohol at birth.

The Oklahoman reports the agency listed 375 addicted newborns in the 12-months ending June 30, the latest data available. Of those, 42 babies showed symptoms of withdrawal, which can include seizures, excessive crying, fever, sweating and vomiting.

OBN officers serve an arrest warrant in Lindsay in December related to a probe into distribution of Mexican meth.
Oklahoma Watch

Although fewer numbers of methamphetamine labs are being discovered across the state, the number of meth-related overdose deaths continues to rise.

Last year, 167 people died of meth-related overdoses, while 421 labs were shut down by the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs. That compares with 140 deaths and 830 lab busts in 2012.

The number of meth-related overdose deaths has been climbing for years. The number of lab discoveries grew to match them until 2012.

Matt Trotter / KWGS

Federal authorities say Tulsa gang members have distributed $10 million worth of cocaine from Mexican cartels and murdered at least one witness since 2011.

A federal indictment states more than 50 members and associates of the Hoover Crips have been charged with a total of about 240 criminal offenses. Authorities released the findings of the three-year, multi-agency investigation on Tuesday.

over-the-counter aisle at a pharmacy
David Morris / Flickr Creative Commons

 The Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics says a new registry linking the sales of pseudoephedrine with neighboring states has blocked up to 90,000 sales of the drug in its first year of operation.

The Oklahoma Legislature passed a law in 2012 that links Oklahoma's pseudoephedrine database with those in neighboring states.

Proponents of the measure say it restricts the amount of the popular cold and allergy medicine trafficked across state lines. Pseudoephedrine is an ingredient used in manufacturing methamphetamine.

This story was updated at 4:20 p.m. ET.

The head of Mexico's Sinaloa drug cartel, Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, was captured overnight by U.S. and Mexican officials in the Pacific coastal town of Mazatlan.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss China 's move to grab airspace over the East China Sea, and ongoing protests in Ukraine over a jailed political leader, and a scuttled trade pact with the European Union.

The Dallas Morning News Mexico Bureau Chief Alfredo Corchado joins Grillot to talk about his 20-year career. His memoir Midnight in Mexico chronicles his coverage of the country’s war against the drug cartels.

Reporter and author Alfredo Corchado covers a political rally in the border city of Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, in 1986.
Billy Calzada

Alfredo Corchado has spent nearly 20 years covering his native country as the Mexico bureau chief for The Dallas Morning News.

From first reporting on government protests in Ciudad Juárez in the mid-80s, through five presidential administrations and a violent drug war with no end in sight, he says he’s always left with the fact that it’s not enough.

Sports Illustrated publishes the third of its five-part series on allegations of misconduct in Oklahoma State University's football program.

Oklahoma’s arrest rate for marijuana possession is slightly above the national rate, and arrest rates vary considerably among counties, according to an Oklahoma Watch analysis of 10 years’ worth of FBI data.

Click on a button to see a county’s rate of arrests for marijuana possession. Each button is placed on a county seat. The red buttons denote the counties with the highest rates.