eCapitol

State Sen. Patrick Anderson, R-Enid
Oklahoma State Senate

A bill in the Oklahoma Senate could reduce the number of school district administrators in the state by moving to a county-based superintendent system.

eCapitol reports that Sen. Patrick Anderson (R-Enid) filed the measure after an interim study earlier this year. Oklahoma has 77 counties and 521 school districts.

According to Anderson, the state could save up to $40 million dollars if the state uses the county model.

Oklahoma Capitol Building
ana branca / Flickr

Oklahoma’s state budget is becoming more dependant on one-time funding sources, according to state treasurer Ken Miller, during both good and bad economic times.

Miller remarked at the Oklahoma State University Center for Applied Economic Research 2016 Economic Outlook Conference in Oklahoma City that the state should not experience the biggest budget hole in its history at a time of 4.3 percent unemployment, according to Shawn Ashley from eCapitol.

Oklahoma Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission

Oklahoma’s Alcoholic Beverage and Laws Enforcement Commission may become “more aggressive” over funds diverted from the agency by the federal government if the money is not reimbursed, according to a report from eCapitol.

Executive Director Keith Burt told members of the commission at its meeting September 19 that ABLE had not been reimbursed according to its agreement with the federal government.  Last month commissioners were told approximately $61,000 intended for the agency were diverted to satisfy another Oklahoma state agency’s debt.

ensign_beedrill / Flickr Creative Commons

As workers remodel House and Senate space in the State Capitol, lawmakers are confident the construction will not affect a possible special legislative session.

House Media Director Jason Sutton and Senate Communications Director Malia Bennett told eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley the current construction on offices or committee rooms would not impact the work lawmakers may be called to do.

hepingting / Flickr Creative Commons

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say the number of Oklahoma children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder has risen significantly over the past decade.

In 2010, Oklahoma was estimated to have 3,062 children ages 3 to 21 identified as having Autism. That number has risen drastically from 2002, when those reported in the same age group was 844.

Oklahoma Autism Network Director René Daman tells Emily Summars with eCapitol added diagnoses and improvements in the screening process contribute to the increase.