KGOU

economics

Joseph Hollowell and Drew Polk hold a Christmas tree in the tree shaker at Sorghum Mill Tree Farm in Edmond.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The weather is turning colder, and it’s been wet and dreary all week, so Oklahoma’s long-term drought doesn’t necessarily come to mind the way it does during the summer month.

We’ve discussed the effects of Oklahoma’s drought on the cattle ranching industry, but the ongoing climate event also impacts a different kind of agricultural worker – Christmas tree farmers.

Rebecca Cruise provides an update on the kidnapping of hundreds of girls in Nigeria, and Joshua Landis discusses this week’s Syrian rebel departure from Homs.

Later, a conversation with longtime China scholar David Lampton. He argues the country’s leaders have to reconcile a fragmented bureaucracy with explosive economic growth and a rising middle class.

Alison Anzalone / U.S. Department of State Flickr Public Domain

After the power struggle to fill the power vacuum left by Mao Zedong’s death in 1976, right-wing reformers won control of the government and Deng Xiaoping helped China exceed the expectations and predictions of the international community.

Three American professors have won the 2013 Nobel Prize for Economics for their work in identifying long-term trends in the prices of stocks and bonds, based in part on analyzing the role of risk.

Professors Robert J. Shiller of Yale University and Eugene F. Fama and Lars Peter Hansen, both of the University of Chicago, won "for their empirical analysis of asset prices," the Royal Swedish Academy said in announcing the honor Monday.

The European Union is now pledging to help Italy after a boat capsized last week and killed hundreds of African migrants. Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss how European governments are struggling with refugee and asylum policies.

Richard Clarke is famously known for criticizing the Bush Administration for not doing enough to stop 9/11.  But he now focuses on issues of cybersecurity and intellectual property theft, especially by the Chinese government.

Aude / Wikimedia Commons

Former counter-intelligence czar Richard Clarke is best known for testifying before the 9/11 Commission that President George W. Bush failed to take enough action to protect the country ahead of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

Since leaving the Bush Administration in 2003, Clarke has turned his attention to cybersecurity. He’s the author of the 2010 book Cyber War: The Next Threat to National Security and What to Do About It.

“I think for a lot of people a threat is not a threat unless people die,” Clarke says. “But hundreds of billions of dollars move. Cyber crime works.”