economy

Oklahoma Treasurer Ken Miller talks to reporters in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, July 6, 2016. Miller said Oklahoma is muddling through a continued economic downturn.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oil and natural gas production tax collections increased slightly over the past two months, although they're still well below this time last year.

Gross receipts for the month of June were $925.7 million, or 7.4 percent lower than the June 2015 total.

The Journal Record

A study by the group Metro Economics found Oklahoma City recovered from the Great Recession more quickly than the rest of the country. But there's still bad news for the state's economy, according to recent economic indicators.

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis indicates Oklahoma came close to a recession last year due to stagnant energy prices.

Numbers out Wednesday show Oklahoma saw just 0.1 percent gross domestic product growth during the third quarter of 2015. Only Alaska, North Dakota, and West Virginia saw worse numbers – with negative GDP growth. Oklahoma was on par with Texas, New Mexico, Washington, Nevada, Wyoming, and New York at GDP growth below 1 percent.

Bethany Hardzinski / KGOU

On Tuesday, the first organized resistance to Oklahoma’s “right-to-farm” movement gathered at the state Capitol to voice their opposition to State Question 777, which will put the issue before a vote of the people in November 2016.

Some background: right-to-farm is the idea there’s a guaranteed, unalienable right for farmers and ranchers to earn a living free from government intervention.

Oklahoma Treasurer Ken Miller
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma's treasurer says low oil and natural gas prices helped push last month's state revenue below levels from a year earlier. 

Treasurer Ken Miller said Wednesday the state's gross receipts in June were less than collections from the prior year for the second consecutive month and the fourth time in the fiscal year that ended June 30.

Puerto Rico evokes images of beautiful beaches, palm trees and perfect weather. But economically, the island is struggling. It’s in its eighth year of recession, the unemployment rate is 12 percent and tens of thousands of people have left the island in recent years in search of better opportunities.

Puerto Rico is now $73 billion in debt and no longer able to meet its payments, and the government is facing the very real possibility that it will run out of money by July.

401 (K) 2012 / Flickr.com

A new monthly survey report says April results suggest that slow economic growth remains ahead for nine Midwestern and Plains states.

The survey report issued Friday says the overall Mid-America Business Conditions Index rose to 52.7 last month from 51.4 in March.

Creighton University economist Ernie Goss oversees the survey, and he says rising economic expectations from non-energy firms, resulting from lower energy prices, "more than offset economic pessimism stemming from weakness in firms directly tied to energy."

okpolicy.org

Unresolved issues tied to education, incarceration and mental health services will hamstring Oklahoma’s ability to remain among the nation’s top 5 fastest growing economies, a panel of government officials and economists concluded during the Oklahoma Policy Institute’s 2nd Annual State Budget Summit.

On January 29, OPI Director of Policy Gene Perry led the panel through “An Economic Check-Up” of the state’s current economic conditions and fiscal policies. 

Kate Hiscock / Flickr Creative Commons

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission says the state's unemployment rate declined by two-tenths of a percentage point in December, from 4.4 percent in November to 4.2 percent.

State officials said Tuesday that five of the state's nine seasonally adjusted business sectors added jobs in December. Professional and business services led the way with an over-the-month increase of 2,000 jobs. The construction, educational and health services and government sectors also posted sizeable gains for the month.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss day-after-Christmas traditions around the world, and Joshua Landis provides an update on how economies around the world have fared during 2014.

Then, a conversation with photojournalist and activist Paula Allen. For a quarter century, she has chronicled the stories of these women during and after the search for their missing family members. She published her photos in the book Flowers in the Desert.

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