election

Joe Dorman and Mary Fallin
Wikimedia Commons

A new poll by Rasmussen on the Oklahoma governor’s race shows within the margin of error. Likely voters support for Gov. Fallin at 45 percent and opponent State Rep. Joe Dorman (D-Rush Springs) at 40 percent. Seven percent favor some other candidate, while eight percent are undecided.

GOP Senator Inhofe, 79, Refutes Primary Opponents

Jun 17, 2014
U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.)
Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Longtime Oklahoma Sen. Jim Inhofe is rejecting claims by some of his challengers in the GOP primary that he's been in Washington too long and it's time for new blood in that office.

The 79-year-old says he expects that type of criticism, but said in an interview Tuesday with The Associated Press that he's still the best candidate to represent the interests of Oklahoma in Washington.

Inhofe faces four Republican challengers in next week's primary: D. Jean McBride-Samuels, Rob Moye, Evelyn Rogers and Erick Wyatt.

Sample ballots for the June 24 elections in Oklahoma County.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Oklahoma residents who want to vote in the June 24 primary election have until Friday to register.

Voter registration forms are available at each county election board, post offices, tag agencies and libraries, or can be downloaded from the Oklahoma State Election Board website.

Residents who wish to vote must either register in person or have their applications postmarked before Friday's deadline.

Oklahoma has a closed primary system, where Republicans and Democrats can only vote for candidates of their particular party.

He's far behind former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in a recent poll of Democrats, but Vice President Joe Biden tells CNN that "there's no obvious reason" why he shouldn't seek his party's 2016 presidential nomination.

The network reports that:

Author: Hall, Edward S. Publisher: H.H. Lloyd & Co. / Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the BPL

Three political scientists who study the politics of southern states in the U.S. say shifts in population from rural areas to urban centers could help Democrats win more elections.

Scott Buchanan of the Citadel Symposium on Southern Politics says there is evidence the move is already taking place in Florida and Virginia.

Buchanan also says the coast of South Carolina is seeing an influx of immigration from other states, changing the politics of the area.

The Democrats lost the south, in part, because they failed to develop their party, according to the University of Georgia’s Charles S. Bullock III. He says they took their dominance for granted and did not develop candidates in the face of a rising GOP presence.

KellyK / Flickr Creative Commons

Elected officials, including state legislators, would have to pass a test indicating their basic knowledge of the office they hold under a plan being proposed by a state lawmaker.

Claremore Republican Rep. Marty Quinn is hosting an interim study Thursday to discuss his idea of improving training requirements for elected county officials, including testing requirements.

Dewey Bartlett
Dewey Bartlett for Mayor Facebook

Tulsa voters have re-elected Dewey Bartlett as their mayor.

Unofficial returns Tuesday showed Bartlett with 55 percent of the vote in his race against Kathy Taylor, who preceded Bartlett in office.

The mayor said at a victory party Tuesday evening that Taylor had called him to concede the race. He told supporters he would work to ensure the city creates jobs, fights crime and lives within its budget.

Taylor said that while she may have lost, Tulsa won because of an honest discussion about its future.

Part two of our "Secret Persuasion" story reported with the Center for Responsive Politics. Read the first part here.

As tax-exempt organizations become a vehicle of choice for big political donors, one powerful appeal is the anonymity. Federal laws allow tax-exempt groups — unlike political committees — to withhold their donor lists from disclosure.

Here's a cheat sheet about Tuesday's elections, starting with the most surprising news:

Voters line up in Tulsa for early voting - October 31, 2008.
thefixer / Flickr Creative Commons

The days for early voting are changing in Oklahoma, thanks to a new state law.

Beginning this week, voters can cast in-person absentee ballots at their county election board offices on Thursday and Friday before an election.

Early voting on Saturdays will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., but only for state and federal elections. Because next week's election is a special election, not state or federal, there will be no early voting on Saturday.

Previously, early voting days were Friday, Saturday and Monday. The new state law took effect last week.

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