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The primary election for mayor of Oklahoma City will be held on Feb. 13. Candidates David Holt, Taylor Neighbors and Randall Smith are on the ballot.

All Oklahoma City voters registered by Jan.19 are eligible to vote.

Oklahoma Watch

Already one of the most conservative states in the nation, Oklahoma continues to grow redder.

Latino Legislators Remain Few But Represent Range of Districts

Jul 21, 2017

In just under one year, the number of Hispanics in Oklahoma’s statehouse has jumped 200 percent.

But that’s only because the election of one man to the House in November and another to the Senate last week brought the number of Hispanic, or Latino, lawmakers up from one to three.

One of the brand names of American polling, Gallup, is letting the 2016 horse race simply gallop on by.

After a 2012 election in which the storied organization was further off than other polls, it has decided it won't conduct any head-to-head polling in the presidential primary or general election. Politico first reported the news.

That doesn't mean Gallup is out of the polling game entirely. The company will still conduct research about broader issue and opinion trends across the country.

Oklahoma State Senator David Holt, R-Oklahoma City.
Oklahoma Senate

More than a third of Oklahoma's eligible voters aren't registered, so lawmakers are considering allowing online registration to make the process more convenient and renew interest in elections.

State Election Board statistics show that more than 2.1 million people were registered to vote in January 2005. Ten years later and about 10 percent more residents, 119,280 fewer Oklahoma residents were registered to vote.

Last year's general election drew less than 30 percent of Oklahoma's eligible voters.

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Janet Barresi
Oklahoma Department of Education

While national groups like governors' associations were among the top donors for state-level elections across the country in 2014, in Oklahoma it was candidates themselves who spent the most money trying to win elections last year.

A new analysis from the Washington-based Center for Public Integrity shows the top single donor to a state-level election in Oklahoma was former Republican State Superintendent Janet Barresi, who gave $1.3 million to her own unsuccessful re-election campaign.

Americans don’t have their facts straight. At least that’s the conclusion of a new study from the research group Ipsos-MORI.

When it comes to the nation’s biggest issues, many Americans do not know the basics. They massively overestimate unemployment rates and the number of immigrants. They assume that the nation’s murder rate is rising, when in fact it’s falling.

Democratic challenger for Lt. Governor, Cathy Cummings (l) and Republican incumbent, Lt. Governor Todd Lamb (r).
Wikipedia Commons

The campaign for Oklahoma's second highest office tops an undercard of statewide offices in the Nov. 4 general election that also includes a low-key race for commissioner of labor but no contests for other statewide seats in which incumbents were unopposed or the race was decided in a primary election.

Republican Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb is running for a second four-year term as the state's second-in-charge against Democrat Cathy Cummings.

Republican Commissioner of Labor Mark Costello is seeking for a second four-year term in a low-key campaign against Democrat Mike Workman, a former public school band director from Tulsa.

Other offices won't be on the ballot because incumbents ran unopposed or races were settled in primaries. They include auditor and inspector, attorney general, treasurer, insurance commissioner and corporation commissioner.

WyoFile WyoFile / Flickr Creative Commons

More than two million Oklahomans will be eligible to vote in November’s general election, according to numbers released Thursday by the State Election Board.

About 2,014,000 Oklahomans are registered to vote, a net increase of more than 35,000 since Jan. 15, State Election Board Secretary Paul Ziriax reported Wednesday.

Republicans now make up the largest share of voters since 1960 when the board began compiling statewide voter registration statistics, accounting for 43.6 percent of voters. Democrats make up 43.8 percent of the voters and still outnumber the GOP, according to the State Election Board, just 5,100 voters more than Republicans.

StickWare / Flickr

Two combat veterans, a contentious state schools superintendent race, and Oklahoma's first African-American female Senate candidate face Oklahoma voters this week.

Early voting began Thursday and continued into the weekend, and the winners in Tuesday's runoff advance to November's election to square off against nominees who found out their fate just over two months ago after the June 24 primary.

KGOU News Director Ben Fenwick gathered University of Oklahoma political scientist Keith Gaddie, Oklahoma Watch political reporter M. Scott Carter, and eCapitol News Director Shawn Ashley to discuss some of the implications of what's left on the ballot.

Here are three contests they're keeping an eye on:

StickWare / Flickr

Early voting begins Thursday in runoffs that feature two statewide races for Democratic voters and runoffs for both parties in the 5th District U.S. House contest. 

Democrats will choose nominees in a U.S. Senate race and for Superintendent of Public Instruction. Several state House and Senate contests are also on the ballot.

eCapitol's Shawn Ashley told KGOU's Ben Fenwick it's the first time Oklahoma has had statewide races in a runoff in August, and that could affect voter turnout. 

Gov. Mary Fallin enters the House chamber of the state capitol shortly before delivering her State of the State address February 3, 2014.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The latest campaign finance reports show Gov. Mary Fallin has topped more than $3 million in contributions to her re-election campaign and is continuing to distance herself from her opponents in fundraising.

Campaign contribution and expenditure reports due by midnight Tuesday show Fallin raised a little more than $3 million for the reporting period that ended June 9, with more than $1.5 million remaining in cash on hand. Fallin faces two little-funded GOP challengers in next Tuesday's primary election -- Dax Ewbank and Chad Moody.

Common Core Repeal Heats Up Primary Race

Jun 8, 2014

Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin's decision to set aside Common Core education standards further heats up an already-hot race for state schools superintendent.

Fallin signed a bill Thursday repealing standards set to take effect in August. Oklahoma returns to guidelines in place before 2010, but will set new ones.

Both Fallin and incumbent state superintendent Janet Barresi initially supported Common Core but changed their positions. Even before the bill was passed, Barresi drew two GOP challengers this year. Conservatives have said they fear Common Core allows too much federal influence over state schools.