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energy

Oklahoma has more natural gas reserves than all but three other states. And it now accounts for about 40 percent of the state's power generation.

Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm
Provided / Continental Resources

Many energy company executives are afraid to talk about oil, according to Continental Resoures CEO Harold Hamm.

“Energy has treated Oklahoma so well,” said Hamm speaking at the Governor’s Energy Conference last fall. “A third of production comes from Oklahoma. That’s tremendous.”

Fallin: Oklahoma’s Energy Plan Showing Success

Apr 15, 2013
CALI2OKIE / Flickr (Creative Commons)

Building new markets for Oklahoma energy products is a goal of Gov. Mary Fallin’s energy plan.

Several speakers at the Governor’s Energy Conference praised Fallin’s administration for developing a plan for the state energy sector.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the death and legacy of Former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, and the heightened tensions between North Korea, the U.S., and its allies as the reclusive country threatens to launch a medium-range ballistic missile.

Retired State Department official and former U.S. Army Colonel Lawrence Wilkerson returns to World Views for a conversation about Iran, the energy industry, and nuclear security.

A painting on the walls of the former U.S. embassy in Tehran
David Holt London / Flickr

Iranian state television says the Islamic Republic inaugurated two key nuclear-related projects Tuesday, just days after another round of talks with world powers seeking to limit Tehran’s atomic program.

Retired State Department official Lawrence Wilkerson described what he calls “delusional security” in foreign policy that’s bubbled up in both Tehran and Washington, D.C. over the last three to five years.

“It's come to a peak ostensibly over the nuclear issue, but what it's coming to a peak over really is a power struggle in the Gulf for who's going to be the power to be reckoned with outside the United States,” Wilkerson says.

Katie Keranen’s findings, published Tuesday in the geoscience journal Geology, adds to a growing chorus of scientific evidence suggesting that injection and disposal wells are likely causing an uptick of earthquakes in the continental United States.

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