environment

Environment
5:34 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Quapaw Tribe Leads Cleanup Of Federal Hazmat Site

A sinkhole near the Tar Creek/Picher Superfund site in Northeast Oklahoma.
Credit Janice Waltzer / Flickr Creative Commons

A Native American tribe in Oklahoma is poised to become the first tribe in the country to lead and manage the cleanup of a federal hazardous waste site.

The Quapaw Tribe is cleaning up a site where a Catholic church and boarding school that tribal members attended once stood. The land was later leased to various companies and mined for lead and zinc. When mining stopped, large piles of leftover mining waste were left behind. This caused health problems for residents.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
12:59 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Oklahoma AG And Energy Group Sue U.S. Government Over Endangered Species Settlements

The Lesser Prairie Chicken
Credit USDAgov / Flickr Creative Commons

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt and the Domestic Energy Producers Alliance on Monday filed a lawsuit against the federal government, accusing the Department of the Interior and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service of “colluding” with environmental groups to bypass public rule-making procedures to enact endangered species regulations.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
10:11 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Cleanup Of Hazardous Oklahoma Refinery Site Went Unfunded Until People Moved In

Tyler Lane pulls up a wooden marker covered with oily sludge in the land behind his Bristow home. Lane uses stakes and rope to keep his two children out of the oiliest, most dangerous parts of his property, which sits atop the abandoned Wilcox Refinery, Oklahoma’s newest Superfund site.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

You can’t see it from street, or when you look out the window of Glen Jones’ parents’ house, but the Wilcox Refinery is still here. Parts of it, anyway.

In December 2013, the abandoned refinery complex near Bristow became Oklahoma’s newest federal Superfund site. The Wilcox Refinery closed more than 50 years ago, but lead and other toxic chemicals remain, and residents are uneasy about the long cleanup ahead.

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World Views
1:32 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

Exploring Large-Scale Human Influence On Landscape And Ecology

Erle Ellis investigated nitrogen cycling across an entire village in China under pre-industrial, nitrogen-limiting conditions relative to the nitrogen-saturated conditions of 1994 to assess the role of nitrogen cycling in sustainable agricultural management.
Credit Erle Ellis

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Erle Ellis.

Over the last three decades, certain environmental scientists have started characterizing a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, to mark the moment when humans started profoundly affecting ecological landscapes.

University of Maryland, Baltimore County ecologist Erle Ellis studies how agriculture, hunting, settlements, and other human activity have changed landscapes. He estimates three-quarters of earth’s land could be characterized as anthropogenic. But even as humans influence their environment, the mass influx of residents into urban centers can reverse that process.

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

World Views: September 27, 2013

Listen to the entire September 27, 2013 episode.

Over the last decade, the foreign-born population in Mexico has nearly doubled, and the country is turning into an immigrant destination. Suzette Grillot talks with University of Oklahoma Latin America scholar Alan McPherson about the new dynamics of migration in our southern neighbor.

Later, a conversation with environmental journalist Emma Marris. She writes about “assisted migration” - deliberately helping plants and animals colonize new habitats.

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World Views
11:56 am
Thu September 26, 2013

Beyond The “Three Rs”: Environmental Conservation In The 21st Century

A "rambunctious garden" in San Francisco, Cali.
Emma Marris Tumblr

Environmentally-conscious waste disposal has been a mainstream movement for nearly half-a-decade, but journalist Emma Marris says conservation in the modern era can go beyond the mantra of “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.”

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StateImpact Oklahoma
11:18 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Q&A: Oklahoma’s New Secretary Of Energy And Environment

Now-retired Col. Michael Teague commanded the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Tulsa District, which includes Lake Eufaula, a lake that illustrates the delicate balance of different water needs in Oklahoma.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Traditionally, Oklahoma’s governor has relied on advice from separate officials representing energy and the environment.

But in July, Gov. Mary Fallin moved to combine the two offices into one. “Strong energy policy is strong environmental policy,” Fallin said in a statement accompanying an executive order creating the new Secretary of Energy and Environment cabinet secretary post.

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Science
2:03 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Wise Old Whooping Cranes Keep Captive-Bred Fledglings On Track

This young whooping crane is on its first fall migration, guided by an Operation Migration ultralight aircraft. Each whooper in this population wears an identification band, and many carry tracking devices that record their movements in detail.
Joe Duff Operation Migration USA Inc.

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 1:40 pm

Being a wildlife biologist in the 21st century increasingly means rescuing rare animals from extinction. Among the success stories is the whooping crane. Seventy years ago there were only about 16 birds left on the planet. Now there are about 600.

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