European Union

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump walks with Mexico President Enrique Pena Nieto at the end of their joint statement at Los Pinos, the presidential official residence, in Mexico City, Wednesday.
Dario Lopez-Mills / AP

As the United States gears up for the 2016 presidential election, voters must tackle the ever-present concerns of foreign policy and international engagement. In an era of globalization, increasingly open channels of information, disputes over land and growing trans-national trade, Americans are trying to figure out America’s role in the world.

Thomas Weiss has spent 40 year studying global governance, the idea that international organizations and groups can work together to solve issues that transcend geographic borders. He'll talk with Suzette Grillot about what it would take for a new generation of intergovernmental organization like what happened after World War II.

But first, she'll be joined by University of Oklahoma political economist and European Union expert Mitchell Smith to talk about what’s next for the United Kingdom and the European Union two weeks after the “Brexit” vote.

Women hold posters during a protest opposing Britain's exit from the European Union in Berlin, Saturday, July 2, 2016. About 50 people staged a protest Saturday in front of Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate against the recent British referendum to leave the EU.
Markus Schreiber / AP

Two weeks after a majority of British voters declared they wanted to leave the European Union, there’s still a tremendous amount of uncertainty about how exactly that’s going to happen.

A Pro-Brexit campaigner hands out leaflets at Liverpool Street station in London, Wednesday, March 23, 2016.
Frank Augstein / AP

Six days from now British voters head to the polls for a referendum on whether or not to leave the European Union. The June 23 vote may be the first step toward concluding Britain’s more than 40-year awkward relationship with the rest of continental Europe.

Suzette Grillot talks with Maxine Margolis, an anthropologist at the University of Florida and Columbia University’s institute of Latin American Studies. She’s spent her career studying the thousands of college-educated Brazilians come to the United States every year.

But first, last week’s discussion of the ongoing migrant crisis continues with Mitchell Smith, who chairs the University of Oklahoma's European Union Center. He discusses the EU policy responses to the refugees and other migrants arriving in Europe.

Messages of support for migrants and refugees chalked on a wall in Budapest, Hungary - Sept. 3, 2015.
Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung / Flickr

On Monday the 22 member states of the European Union plan to hold a special meeting in Brussels to discuss what to do about the hundreds of thousands of migrants fleeing areas of Iraq and Syria torn apart by self-proclaimed Islamic State militants.

European Union Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker wants the nearly two dozen countries to endorse a plan forcing member states to grant asylum to nearly 160,000 refugees fleeing the Middle East.

World Views: July 24, 2015

Jul 24, 2015

Guest host Rebecca Cruise is joined by University of Oklahoma professor and European Union expert Mitchell Smith about how Greece got to its current economic crisis, and why its citizens are still on a "quest for hope."

Then Suzette Grillot talks with geographer Kathleen O’Reilly about the gender and social issues of sanitation projects in India.

Police guard the National Bank of Greece in Athens. Undated, uploaded Feb. 13, 2015.
Global Panorama / Flickr

The Greek parliament passed a series of economic and judicial reform measures stipulated by creditors on Thursday, allowing talks to go forward on a bailout package for the country.

If a deal is reached, it would mark the third bailout package for Greece in five years and is expected to be worth as much as 85 billion euros, according to the Associated Press.

To Be Young And Greek In A Time Of Crisis

Jun 29, 2015

In Greece, a breakdown in negotiations between the Greek government and its creditors has put Greece on the verge of default and an exit from the eurozone.

Greek banks were closed after a flood of fear-driven withdrawals, and they won’t open until next week. Greek citizens are being asked to decide the fate of the country in a referendum Friday on the economic terms that creditors are asking for in exchange for fresh aid.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss tensions between Israel and the United States ahead of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s address to Congress next week, and European nations that are working to develop a more unified energy policy.

Then, a conversation with art historian Maya Stanfield-Mazzi. She studies pre-Colombian art in the Andes, and says the work of South America’s Inca culture was abstract, without a clear narrative.

Samer Shehata joins Suzette Grillot to talk about democratic developments in Egypt, and how the conviction of journalists and questions about the fairness of May’s elections have affected the country’s relations with the United States.

Later, a conversation about police cooperation and Europe’s internal security policy with Canisius College political scientist John Occhipinti.

JurgenNL / Wikimedia Commons

Europol, based in The Hague, Netherlands, is the European Union’s police office. Staffed by high-level police officers from the 28 EU member states, John Occhipinti says it functions as the “hub of a liaison network” that manages a database of criminal intelligence.

Suzette Grillot talks with Italian citizen and lawyer Katia Girotto about the outcome of European parliamentary elections, and how Italians feel about the elections' impact on the future of EU politics and economics.

Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis discuss television and social media in Lebanon with University of Balamand journalism department head Ramez Maluf. He says Beirut's position as a major entertainment production hub is controversial among conservatives and Arab intellectuals.

University of Oklahoma Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students Clarke Stroud joins Suzette Grillot again on their European tour to discuss the concept of “euroskepticism” and the European Union's parliamentary elections.

Later, a conversation with UCLA historian Nile Green about putting Islam into the context of global history. He says the same religious fragmentation that causes sectarian violence in the Middle East leads to religious misunderstanding in the West.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss China 's move to grab airspace over the East China Sea, and ongoing protests in Ukraine over a jailed political leader, and a scuttled trade pact with the European Union.

The Dallas Morning News Mexico Bureau Chief Alfredo Corchado joins Grillot to talk about his 20-year career. His memoir Midnight in Mexico chronicles his coverage of the country’s war against the drug cartels.