farm bill

After a vicious battle in Washington, Congress passed a new Farm Bill in February. The massive bill touches everything from food stamps to environmental conservation to farm supports.

Many corporations and environmental advocacy groups spent a lot of money lobbying to get their issues passed.

Senator Jim Inhofe / Facebook

With a vote of 68-32, the Senate approved a sweeping farm bill Tuesday that will set rules and practices for American agriculture for five years.

Both of Oklahoma's U.S. Senators voted against the measure.

The bill does away with controversial direct cash payments made to farmers under a subsidy system, replacing it with crop insurance.

U.S. Rep. Frank Lucas (R-Okla.), Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee.
Carl Sandburg College / Flickr Creative Commons

The House of Representatives voted Wednesday to pass a five-year farm bill, and Oklahoma's all-Republican House delegation split on the nearly $100 billion-a-year legislation.

The measure included small cuts to the food stamps program, and preserved some farm subsidies. The vote in the House was 251-166.

U.S. Rep. Frank Lucas (R-Okla.), Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee.
Carl Sandburg College / Flickr Creative Commons

The House has passed a scaled-down version of a massive farm bill, putting off a fight over food stamp spending and giving Republican leaders a victory after a decisive defeat on the larger bill last month.

All five members of Oklahoma's Congressional delegation joined their GOP colleagues in voting for the bill.

U.S. Rep. Frank Lucas (R-Okla.) is the Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee. He said in a statement he was pleased the bill made it through his chamber.

RepFrankLucas / Flickr

Sixty-two Republicans voted against the five-year, half-trillion-dollar farm bill that would have cute $2 billion annual from food stamps and let states impose broad new work requirements on those who receive them.

Freshman U.S. Rep. Jim Bridenstine (R-Okla. 1) was the only Oklahoma congressman to vote against the farm bill.

President Obama will be advised to veto a multi-year farm bill slated to be discussed in the House this week, the White House says. The administration issued a statement on the legislation Monday afternoon, criticizing it for cutting food programs for the poor.

At more than 575 pages, the bipartisan bill was introduced by Reps. Frank Lucas, R-Okla., and Collin Peterson, D-Minn., the chairman and ranking member of the House Committee on Agriculture.