KGOU

favelas

A hilly road in Rocinha.
chensiyuan / Wikimedia Commons

While beach-side resorts and events such as Carnival have long made Rio de Janeiro a hot spot for international tourism, in recent years more and more visitors are venturing outside the glamor of Rio’s wealthy Zona Sul region to explore Brazil’s sprawling slums, known as favelas.

As President Obama and world leaders convened in France to commemorate the 70th anniversary of D-Day, Suzette Grillot spoke with Italian citizen Katia Girotto about Italy's memory of World War II. June 4 marked the 70th anniversary of the fall of Rome.

Later, a conversation with University of Oklahoma anthropologist Erika Robb Larkins about Brazil's favela neighborhoods ahead of next week's opening of the World Cup, and the 2016 Olympics.

At the top of Rocinha favela in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Suzette Grillot / KGOU

A week before the 2014 FIFA World Cup begins in Brazil, soccer’s international governing body has expressed concern that three of the stadiums won’t be ready, and legendary Brazilian striker Ronaldo says he’s “appalled” by his country’s preparations for the sport’s biggest event.

Suzette Grillot wraps up a three week, two continent trip with a conversation from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil with University of Oklahoma anthropologist and International Studies professor Erika Robb Larkins.

Later, Suzette and Rebecca Cruise discuss the five Oscar nominees for Best Foreign Language Film ahead of Sunday evening's Academy Awards.

Suzette Grillot / KGOU

Rio de Janeiro is known throughout the world for its Carnival celebration and an incredibly diverse and lively culture, but this vibrant image contrasts with striking examples of inequality.

University of Oklahoma anthropologist and International Studies professor Erika Robb Larkins says “the beauty of the contradiction of Brazil” is the coexistence of cultural vibrancy and the challenges facing segments of the population. Wealth neighbors poverty in close proximity throughout Rio de Janeiro.