Firat Demir

Suzette Grillot is still in Turkey, and talks with University of Oklahoma economist Firat Demir again this week about Saturday's bombing in Ankara, and the response from the government and everyday Turks.

Then Suzette explores some of the parallels between Brazil’s military dictatorships, and the country’s LGBTQ subculture in the 20th century with Brown University historian James Green. They'll also discuss evolving U.S. opposition to Brazil’s military junta in the 1960s and 70s.

Protesters on the streets of Izmir, Turkey Ocotber 10, 2015 after the bombing in Ankara earlier in the day.
Suzette Grillot / KGOU

Saturday’s bombing at a peace rally in Ankara – and related protests across the country – have united citizens in their frustration with Turkey’s leadership even as government officials say the attacks were intended to widen fissures and stir discontent in the country that straddles Europe and Asia.

Suzette Grillot talks with University of Oklahoma economist Firat Demir about how the millions of refugees streaming into Syria are affecting daily life in Istanbul, and could impact parlimentary elections weeks from now.

Then, a conversation about business ethics and responsibility in the developing world with Melike Yetken. She works with the U.S. State Department's Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor.

A vendor sells coffee in the Turkish city of Izmir - September 21, 2015.
Charles Roffey / Flickr

No country has been more affected by the crisis of migrants and refugees fleeing Syrian than its northern neighbor, Turkey.

Millions of Syrians have escaped into Turkey, with hundreds of thousands in Istanbul alone – dwarfing the numbers seen in Europe.

Suzette Grillot reports from Istanbul, where she speaks with University of Oklahoma economist Firat Demir about the international response to Monday's deadly tornado in Moore, Okla., and political problems facing Turkey.

University of Oregon political scientist Richard Kraus joins the program for a conversation about how art and culture become a testing ground between the United States and China. He's the author of author of Pianos and Politics in China: Middle-Class Ambitions and the Struggle over Western Music.

FreedomHouse2 / Flickr

After decades of fighting, the conflict between the Kurdish nationalist group the PKK and the Turkish government finally drew to a close with a ceasefire in March.

Peace in Turkey may be short-lived, though. Violence in neighboring Syria is steadily intensifying, forcing a reluctant Turkey to respond and possibly putting citizens at risk.

“Most people among the Kurdish population are very optimistic,” says Firat Demir, a University of Oklahoma economist. “The last thing now that a citizen of Turkey wants is to have another civil conflict after this 80-year-old bloody conflict that is ending.”