gun control

A decision by organizers of a popular music festival in Norman to ban weapons during an upcoming three-day concert has prompted a lawsuit by a gun rights group whose members want to carry their firearms at the outdoor concert.

The Oklahoma Second Amendment Association filed a lawsuit Wednesday in Cleveland County seeking to stop the ban from taking effect during the festival next weekend in the city's downtown area. The association claims the city has no right to prohibit people from carrying concealed or even openly displayed firearms on city property.

Emily Allen /

Oklahoma and twenty other states are asking a federal appeals court to overturn provisions of Maryland's gun-control law that ban 45 assault weapons and a limit gun magazines to 10 rounds.

West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey led the coalition in filing a friend-of-the-court brief in the Fourth U.S. Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia last week.

The brief says the law violates the Second Amendment right to keep firearms in homes for self-protection.

Blind Noman /

A Norman high school was locked down briefly after police got into a foot chase with a student suspected of selling marijuana.

Norman Public Schools spokeswoman Shelly Hickman says Norman North High School was placed on lockdown for about 45 minutes Monday afternoon while police took the male student into custody.

Hickman says police and school administrators were interviewing the student Monday afternoon when the student got up and ran from the room.

The school was briefly placed on lockdown while police chased the student and then detained him.

Scott Beale /

The author of an interim study concerning guns on college and university campuses urged higher education officials Wednesday to work with him in finding a middle ground or face the likelihood that weapons would be allowed with few restrictions.

Scott Beale /

The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation says a new state law could affect people who are applying for gun licenses this year.

The agency said Tuesday that the law going into effect Nov. 1 modifies the state's Self-Defense Act, making certificates expire after three years. Previously, the certificates did not expire.

OSBI says residents who have completed a gun safety training course should begin the application process for a license as soon as possible.

Matteo Paciotti /

The Oklahoma City city council has approved a liquor license for a new gun range expected to open this spring.

KOKH reports that councilors approved the liquor license for Wilshire Gun Range on Tuesday.

The 40,000-square-foot establishment includes 24 firearm lanes, 10 archery lanes and a cafe where food and alcohol will be served.

Wilshire Gun co-owner Jeff Swanson says customers' driver's licenses will be flagged once they order a drink, preventing them from drinking alcohol before entering the shooting facilities.

Emily Allen /

Legislation that authorizes persons with concealed handgun licenses to store their handgun in a locked vehicle on school parking lots has been signed into law by Gov. Mary Fallin.

The bill is among eight bills that Fallin signed into law Friday.

For gun control advocates hoping to see federal gun laws tighten after the shootings in Newtown, Conn., 2013 was a disheartening year. A narrow provision to expand background checks failed in the Senate.

For gun rights activists, the death of that legislation proved once more their single-issue intensity and decades-long grass-roots organizing were enough to prevail. Those are also valuable lessons for their opponents.

A 'Voice' For Lost Children

John Morse was president of the Colorado Senate until September, when he became the first elected official recalled in the state's history.

Three months later, he's climbing the rotunda steps of the gold-domed Capitol building — his office for seven years. He hasn't been here since October. Gazing up at the dome, he says, "This is one of my favorite things to do. That's my version of smelling the roses."

Morse's political career ended over the gun bills he pushed through these chambers eight months ago. But he says he would do it all again.

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A 19-year-old has been sentenced to 30 months in prison for planning an attack at Bartlesville High School that was never carried out.

The Bartlesville Examiner-Enterprise reports Sammie Eaglebear Chavez was sentenced Tuesday by Washington County District Judge Curtis DeLapp.

He was convicted in September of planning a mass shooting and bombing, though no attack was carried out. The jury recommended the 30-month sentence.