KGOU

Harold Hamm

Donald Trump at a campaign stop at the Oklahoma State Fair in September 2015.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Donald Trump is wooing energy-state voters by promising a presidency that will champion coal, promote drilling and free frackers from federal regulations limiting oil and gas development.

If the Republican candidate’s energy platform sounds like it was written specifically for fossil fuel companies, that’s because an Oklahoma oil billionaire helped craft it.

Donald Trump delivered his first major speech on U.S. energy policy at a petroleum conference in the capital city of one the country’s most oil-rich states, Bismark, North Dakota.

Harold Hamm, CEO of Continental Resources, speaks during the third day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Wednesday, July 20, 2016.
Mark J. Terrill / AP

Billionaire Oklahoma oilman Harold Hamm sharply criticized environmental regulations in a pro-Donald Trump speech on energy policy at the Republican National Convention Wednesday night.

The Continental Resources CEO's remarks came amid reports he would be named energy secretary if the Republican candidate is elected in November.

An artist’s conception of the new convention center in downtown Oklahoma City.
Populous and GSB Inc.

During Tuesday’s Oklahoma City Council meeting, Ward 5’s David Greenwell said it’s hard to get excited about things like the proposed MAPS 3 convention center until you see some of the architectural renderings.

Those were presented this week, and one of the issues with this new convention center seems to be parking.

Ward 2 councilman Ed Shadid, who’s pretty vocal about his concerns when it comes to using public money for large-scale projects, raised the point during the architects’ presentation.

Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm at the 2012 Time 100 gala.
David Shankbone / Flickr

This week, the price of oil fell below $30 for the first time since December 2003. It’s also down 72 percent from $107 just 18 months ago.

But Oklahoma’s wealthiest resident and the head of Continental Resources says he expects crude prices to double by the end of the year. In a Wednesday interview with The Associated Press, Harold Hamm said even though he thinks oil hasn’t bottomed out just yet, it will hit $60 by this time next year:

Gov. Mary Fallin speaking at the 2013 Governor's Energy Conference in Tulsa, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Executives of oil and coal companies pushed Gov. Mary Fallin to “pay more attention” to their industries in public remarks, according to state emails obtained by Greenwire.

The emails, obtained through the Oklahoma Open Records Act, detail internal discussions as Fallin’s prepared for the 2013 Governor’s Energy Conference, Manuel Quiñones and Mike Soraghan report.

Richard Masoner / Flickr.com

A story detailing how University of Oklahoma officials sought a $25 million donation from an oil executive while scientists at the school formulated a state agency’s position on oil and gas-triggered earthquakes is under fire from both the university president and the billionaire oilman. 

University of Oklahoma President David Boren says a recent story questioning the integrity of the university and the Oklahoma Geological Survey is “a bald-faced lie and some of the most inaccurate reporting I’ve ever seen in my life.”

University of Oklahoma officials were seeking a $25 million donation from billionaire oilman Harold Hamm last year, records show, at a time when scientists at the school were formulating the state's position on oil drilling and earthquakes.

Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm at the 2012 Time 100 gala.
David Shankbone / Flickr

Harold Hamm, the billionaire founder and CEO of Continental Resources, denies a report that he told a University of Oklahoma dean he wanted scientists dismissed who were researching links between oil and gas production and Oklahoma’s exponential increase in earthquakes.

Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm
Provided / Continental Resources

Harold Hamm, the billionaire founder and CEO of Continental Resources told a University of Oklahoma dean he wanted scientists dismissed who were researching links between oil and gas activity and this state’s earthquake surge, Bloomberg’s Benjamin Elgin reports.

Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm
Provided / Continental Resources

Harold Hamm, the founder, chairman and CEO of Continental Resources, says he requested a meeting with a state seismologist to get information, not to “bully” a scientist tasked with studying an earthquake surge that has been linked to oil and gas activity.

EnergyWire’s Mike Soraghan reports:

Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm at the 2012 Time 100 gala.
David Shankbone / Flickr

The November 2013 meeting with University of Oklahoma President David Boren wasn’t oil billionaire Harold Hamm’s first attempt to discuss with university officials and a state seismologists Oklahoma’s earthquake surge and possible links to oil and gas activity, a new EnergyWire story reveals.

Austin Holland with the Oklahoma Geological Survey, seated in the center, at a capitol hearing on Oklahoma's earthquake surge.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

In November 2013, Oklahoma state seismologist Austin Holland was called into a meeting with University of Oklahoma President David Boren and Continental Resources Chairman and oil billionaire Harold Hamm, EnergyWire’s Mike Sorgahan reported earlier this month.

The oil price bust has left lots of people licking their financial wounds. Perhaps the biggest one-way bet in the wrong direction came from the oilpatch itself, by a company and its founder at the center of the U.S. oil revolution. Harold Hamm is the $8 billion oilman; the man behind the biggest drilling company in North Dakota, Continental Resources.

A drilling rig in far northwest Oklahoma City.
Kool Cats Photography / Flickr Creative Commons

Crude oil prices have plummeted to the lowest level in three years, a slump analysts say is fueled by reduced demand due to stalling growth in Europe and China, andbooming supply from domestic production in the U.S.

In Oklahoma — a state where, historically, finances have risen and fallen with the fortunes of the energy industry — the tumbling oil price has been met with different reactions from oil and gas company executives, economists and state finance officials.

Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm
Provided / Continental Resources

A judge in Oklahoma is ordering the chairman and CEO of energy giant Continental Resources Inc. to pay his wife nearly $1 billion as part of a divorce settlement.

Close-up of a Pump Jack
neillharmer / Flickr

Executives at Chesapeake Energy, Continental Resources and Devon Energy have proposed a plan for Oklahoma’s taxes on oil and natural gas production.

The proposal comes as legislators are debating state oil and gas taxes, which include an incentive for horizontal drilling that expires next year. The Oklahoman‘sAdam Wilmoth reports:

Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm
Provided / Continental Resources

Harold Hamm, CEO of major Oklahoma-based petroleum producer Continental Resources, used to be against the Keystone XL pipeline.

Then he was for it.

Now he says the pipeline isn’t really needed anymore. 

Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm
Provided / Continental Resources

Oil billionaire Harold Hamm, the CEO and Chairman of Oklahoma energy giant Continental Resources has been tapped to lead state Attorney General Scott Pruitt’s re-election campaign.

The Associated Press reports:

Pruitt described Hamm as a “dedicated businessman, visionary, and icon here in Oklahoma.”

Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm
Provided / Continental Resources

Many energy company executives are afraid to talk about oil, according to Continental Resoures CEO Harold Hamm.

“Energy has treated Oklahoma so well,” said Hamm speaking at the Governor’s Energy Conference last fall. “A third of production comes from Oklahoma. That’s tremendous.”

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