health

Health
3:26 pm
Wed August 13, 2014

New Superbug Skyrockets In Southeast

The drug-resistant bacteria CRE kills about half of those who get it, and it's on the rise in community hospitals. (Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed August 13, 2014 1:40 pm

A new study out this month finds that cases of a new antibiotic-resistant superbug are sky-rocketing in community hospitals in the southeastern U.S.

The bacteria is called CRE, which stands for carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae, and it kills about half of those who get it. Researchers at Duke University Medical Center found that it has increased five fold from 2008 to 2012 in the southeast.

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Health
8:18 am
Tue August 12, 2014

Medical Examiner's Office Gains New Staff, Seeks Path To Reaccreditation

Credit Lora Zibman / Flickr Creative Commons

State officials with the medical examiner’s office say they are one step closer to reaccreditation under the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME) with the hiring of two new staff members. 

Amy Elliott, chief administrative officer for the medical examiner’s office, told the Board of Medicolegal Investigations last week that two new full-time forensic pathologies have joined the state. Dr. Cheryl Niblo joined the Tulsa office in July and Dr. Clay Nichols will join the Oklahoma City home office in September.

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Indian Times
8:30 pm
Fri August 8, 2014

Oklahoma City Indian Clinic Celebrates 40 Years Of Serving Urban Indians

Credit Oklahoma City Indian Clinic

The Oklahoma City Indian Clinic is marking its 40th year in operation with a celebration powwow. It will be held on the Oklahoma City Fairgrounds on August 16th.

The clinic started in 1974 with a handful of volunteer heath care providers looking to fill the need of urban Indians seeking medical care. David Toahty, Chief Development Officer for the clinic, said the first clinic was just a storefront on Hudson. Toahty said the clinic currently serves 18,000 patients and fills 240,000 prescriptions a year.

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Health
11:34 am
Sun June 15, 2014

New Health Report Shows Oklahoma Ranks 44th In The Nation

Credit amboo who? / Flickr Creative Commons

The 2014 State of the State's Health Report released by the Oklahoma State Board of Health shows Oklahoma ranks 44th in overall health status of its residents compared to other states in the nation.

Unhealthy lifestyles and behaviors such as low physical activity and fruit and vegetable consumption, along with a high prevalence of smoking and obesity, contribute to most of the state's leading causes of death. Significant health disparities among many of the state's population also contribute to Oklahoma's health status.

The report says, “Overall, Oklahoma has the fourth highest rate of death from all causes in the nation, 23 percent higher than the national rate. Perhaps more disturbing is the fact that while Oklahoma’s mortality rate dropped five percent over the past 20 years, the U.S. mortality rate dropped 20 percent. So, Oklahoma is not keeping up with the rest of the nation.”

The annual study reports on a range of factors and details information by county.

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World Views
12:00 pm
Fri May 2, 2014

World Views: May 2, 2014

Suzette Grillot, Joshua Landis, and Rebecca Cruise discuss this week's national elections in Iraq, and the growing ethnic tensions and violence in Western China.

Later, a conversation with historian and geographer Abigail Neely. Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection is one of Sub-Saharan Africa’s biggest health challenges, but she questions how closely they’re related, and how poverty affects the immune system.

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World Views
10:02 am
Fri May 2, 2014

Reimagining HIV/AIDS And Healthcare In South Africa

Aid workers explain the relationship between HIV and tuberculosis in South Africa
USAID U.S. Agency for International Development Flickr Creative Commons

HIV/AIDS is commonly considered an individual affliction, however Abigail Neely says that HIV/AIDS needs to be considered within the social, cultural, and economic environment of South Africa.

In South Africa, HIV/AIDS is endemic. Neely says that over 30 percent of the population is infected with HIV, however co-infection with tuberculosis is also prevalent.

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11:37 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Easing Oklahoma Family Caregivers Burden Of Long-Term Medical Demands [VIDEO]

Americans are being released from hospitals quicker and sicker. That’s put new demands on the family members who care for them. PBS Newshour special correspondent Kathleen McCleery reports from Oklahoma.
Cheryl Mitchem never imagined retirement would look like this. When she and her husband, Alphus, stopped working, they planned travel and other adventures. Then, a year ago, a severe headache and a diagnosis of a malignant brain tumor upended the family’s dreams.
Health
1:25 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Experimental Paralysis Treatment Hailed As 'Groundbreaking'

From left, Andrew Meas, Dustin Shillcox, Kent Stephenson and Rob Summers, who are the first four to undergo task-specific training with epidural stimulation at the Human Locomotion Research Center laboratory, Frazier Rehab Institute, as part of the University of Louisville's Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center in Louisville, Kentucky. (University of Louisville)

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 3:46 pm

Four paralyzed men who underwent an experimental treatment involving electric current were able to move their limbs and regain some control of their bowel and bladder function.

The revolutionary new treatment is being hailed as “groundbreaking” by experts. They say the results of the study, which will be published today in the journal Brain, are an important first step toward an eventual cure for spinal cord injury.

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Heart Disease
9:06 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Oklahoma Program Seeks To Improve Heart Health

Cardiovascular disease is the top killer of Oklahomans.
Credit Lizzie279 / Flickr Creative Commons

A new public-private initiative is working to reduce heart attacks and stroke in a five-county area in southeastern Oklahoma.

The Oklahoma Heartland Project combines public health personnel with physicians, nurses, pharmacists, hospitals and insurers to help patients reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke and live a longer, healthier life.

Counties participating in the initiative include Pittsburg, Pontotoc, Coal, Atoka and Latimer. The pilot project is funded through a grant from the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials.

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Shots - Health News
2:22 am
Mon February 10, 2014

New Heat Treatment Has Changed Lives For Some With Severe Asthma

Virginia Rady, 28, holds her old nebulizer at her home in Dallas. Rady was diagnosed with chronic persistent asthma at age 2. She underwent a series of three outpatient surgeries between December 2012 and February 2013 for a procedure known as bronchial thermoplasty. She says the procedure has changed her life, allowing her to remove her nebulizer from her bedside.
Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Originally published on Mon February 10, 2014 7:58 am

If you've ever tried to drink something through one of those little red coffee stirrers instead of a full-sized straw, you know what it's like to breathe with asthma.

Twenty-five million Americans have been diagnosed with asthma. And for 10 percent of them, medications like inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting beta agonists aren't enough to keep them out of the hospital.

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