health

When Alysia Abbott was 22, her dad died of AIDS. It was San Francisco, 1992. Even though her dad was out as a gay man at the time, she wasn’t out about his illness.

There was so much shame and stigma, and she didn’t know anyone else who shared her experience. Not until many years later, when she met Whitney Joiner, who had also lost her father to AIDS the very same year, in rural Kentucky.

Is Sugar More Addictive Than Cocaine?

Jan 7, 2015

The 2015 Dietary Guideline Advisory Committee just released new recommendations to limit added sugars to 10 percent of daily calories. Right now, Americans are eating more sugar than ever before — on average, about 160 pounds a year.

The Wellness Clinic in Roland
Anny Sivilay / Sequoah County Times

This story is part of a joint project by Oklahoma Watch and The Oklahoman, examining the state’s high rate of prescription painkiller overdoses.

If there were an official business model for a high-volume pain clinic, drug enforcers say, it would probably resemble the Wellness Clinic in Roland.

Should you get a blood test to see if you're deficient in vitamin D? It sounds like such a good idea, seeing as how most people don't get enough sunshine to make vitamin D themselves. And the tests are becoming increasingly popular.

But there are problems with making vitamin D tests a standard part of preventive medicine, a federal panel said. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said Monday there's not enough evidence of benefits or harms to recommend vitamin D testing for all.

NIAID / Flickr.com

The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality is advising users of a Delaware County water system to boil water before consuming it after E. coli was found in the water system.

DEQ said Wednesday it's notifying users of the Red Dirt Public Water Supply to inform residents that they should boil water for at least one minute or use bottled water for consumption, food preparation, brushing teeth and washing dishes.

Mercy Health / Flickr.com

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has awarded nearly $5 million in grants to Oklahoma to support programs aimed at preventing chronic diseases like heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will administer the grants, which are partially funded under the federal health care law.

The grants aim to strengthen local and state programs to reduce rates of death caused by tobacco use, obesity, diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

Oklahoma Youths Not Fit For Military

Sep 24, 2014
US Army Africa / Flickr.com

Nearly three out of four young Oklahomans are ineligible for military service for reasons related to obesity, lack of education or having a criminal record, a new study shows.

That percentage of ineligibility is the 14th highest in the country. The report was published by Mission: Readiness, a group composed of 450 retired generals and admirals who are championing the White House’s nutrition reform efforts as a way to combat obesity.

A rarely seen virus is sending children to the hospital with severe respiratory infections, and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning doctors and parents to be on the alert.

"Hospitalizations are higher than would be expected at this time of year," Dr. Anne Schuchat, head of infectious diseases for the CDC, said Monday at a press briefing on enterovirus 68. "The situation is evolving quickly."

Ten states have asked the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to investigate a rare virus suspected of sending hundreds of children in the South and Midwest to the hospital.

Dozens of people have been tested positive for Enterovirus EV-D68. There are more than 100 types of enterovirus, but this one is uncommon. It begins with cold-like symptoms and can cause serious respiratory problems.

The virus isn’t usually deadly, but there are fears that it could spread throughout the country.

One of the great dreams of the medical research world is to help paralyzed people who are unable to use their legs, to be able to walk again.

Implanting electrode stimulators into injured spinal cords has shown some promise. Stem cell spinal cord regeneration has been elusive so far. But one Massachusetts tech company is taking a completely different approach.

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