KGOU

health

NIAID / Flickr.com

The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality is advising users of a Delaware County water system to boil water before consuming it after E. coli was found in the water system.

DEQ said Wednesday it's notifying users of the Red Dirt Public Water Supply to inform residents that they should boil water for at least one minute or use bottled water for consumption, food preparation, brushing teeth and washing dishes.

Mercy Health / Flickr.com

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has awarded nearly $5 million in grants to Oklahoma to support programs aimed at preventing chronic diseases like heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will administer the grants, which are partially funded under the federal health care law.

The grants aim to strengthen local and state programs to reduce rates of death caused by tobacco use, obesity, diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

Oklahoma Youths Not Fit For Military

Sep 24, 2014
US Army Africa / Flickr.com

Nearly three out of four young Oklahomans are ineligible for military service for reasons related to obesity, lack of education or having a criminal record, a new study shows.

That percentage of ineligibility is the 14th highest in the country. The report was published by Mission: Readiness, a group composed of 450 retired generals and admirals who are championing the White House’s nutrition reform efforts as a way to combat obesity.

A rarely seen virus is sending children to the hospital with severe respiratory infections, and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning doctors and parents to be on the alert.

"Hospitalizations are higher than would be expected at this time of year," Dr. Anne Schuchat, head of infectious diseases for the CDC, said Monday at a press briefing on enterovirus 68. "The situation is evolving quickly."

Ten states have asked the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to investigate a rare virus suspected of sending hundreds of children in the South and Midwest to the hospital.

Dozens of people have been tested positive for Enterovirus EV-D68. There are more than 100 types of enterovirus, but this one is uncommon. It begins with cold-like symptoms and can cause serious respiratory problems.

The virus isn’t usually deadly, but there are fears that it could spread throughout the country.

One of the great dreams of the medical research world is to help paralyzed people who are unable to use their legs, to be able to walk again.

Implanting electrode stimulators into injured spinal cords has shown some promise. Stem cell spinal cord regeneration has been elusive so far. But one Massachusetts tech company is taking a completely different approach.

In a commentary published earlier this month in Nature, Harvard professor Sarah S. Richardson and six co-authors caution scientists, journalists and the public against drawing hasty conclusions from findings concerning epigenetic effects on human development.

New Studies: Low-Salt Diet May Be Harmful

Aug 14, 2014

A set of three studies published in the New England Journal of Medicine show that people who consumed less than 3,000 milligrams of salt per day were more likely to have a heart attack or stroke, and more likely to die, than people who consumed between 3,000 and 6,000 milligrams per day.

Average U.S. daily salt intake is about 3,400 milligrams, but groups from the World Health Organization to the American Heart Association recommend significantly lower daily consumption.

New Superbug Skyrockets In Southeast

Aug 13, 2014

A new study out this month finds that cases of a new antibiotic-resistant superbug are sky-rocketing in community hospitals in the southeastern U.S.

The bacteria is called CRE, which stands for carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae, and it kills about half of those who get it. Researchers at Duke University Medical Center found that it has increased five fold from 2008 to 2012 in the southeast.

stethoscope
Lora Zibman / Flickr Creative Commons

State officials with the medical examiner’s office say they are one step closer to reaccreditation under the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME) with the hiring of two new staff members. 

Amy Elliott, chief administrative officer for the medical examiner’s office, told the Board of Medicolegal Investigations last week that two new full-time forensic pathologies have joined the state. Dr. Cheryl Niblo joined the Tulsa office in July and Dr. Clay Nichols will join the Oklahoma City home office in September.

Pages