higher education

ITT Educational Services headquarters in Carmel, Ind.
Michael Conroy / AP

Lawmakers discussed Oklahoma’s for-profit colleges and sexual assaults on college campuses during a pair of interim studies Wednesday in the House Higher Education and Career Tech Committee.

State Rep. Chad Caldwell, R-Enid, requested the study, and Education Secretary Natalie Shirley agreed with his assessment that private vocational schools play an important role in Oklahoma's education system.

The Bizzell Memorial Library at the University of Oklahoma
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education approved tuition and fee increases for public college and universities across the state.

The panel voted unanimously for the rate hike on Thursday. The increase averages 8.4 percent across the state.

The Associated Press reports the tuition fee increases range from Langston University's 3.7 percent increase to Rose State College's 13 percent hike.

Institutions of higher education requested the increase after the state legislature cut funding due to a budget shortfall shortfall.

Original Post:

University of Oklahoma President David Boren speak to reporters after the second day of the Big 12 sports conference meetings in Irving, Texas, Thursday, June 2, 2016.
LM Otero / AP

The University of Oklahoma Board of Regents has approved a 7 percent tuition and fee increase for Fiscal Year 2017. It’s the largest hike for OU students since 2008.

OU President David Boren said during Tuesday’s Regents meeting that OU operates with $160 million less than it did in 2008, despite a 1,000-1,500 increase in the number of students.

Students on the University of Oklahoma campus during the 2016 spring semester.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education may consider raising tuition rates during meetings scheduled for later this month.

eCapitol's Tyler Talley reports Chancellor Glen Johnson said budget cuts that were made during this fiscal year have negatively affected the academic mission and the students at Oklahoma's institutions of higher learning:

Five years ago, Tonia Sina was diagnosed with a blood-clotting disorder called atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.
Photo illustration by Brent Fuchs and Bryan M. Richter / The Journal Record

There’s no shortage of issues to address when it comes to the $900-million-and-counting budget shortfall over the next four months of legislative session.

The number could grow larger when the Board of Equalization certifies new numbers later this month. In Gov. Mary Fallin’s executive budget unveiled Monday during her State of the State address, most state agencies will see a 6 percent cut. Some, like the Oklahoma Health Care Authority, will take a smaller 3 percent hit.

Chancellor for Higher Education Glen Johnson
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education

The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education approved a variety of measures during a meeting Friday with little discussion.

Among those measures was the approval of $963.4 million in state appropriations allocated by the state legislature and expected to be approved by Governor Mary Fallin.

The proposed appropriation total would represent a 2.4 percent cut from higher education's previous fiscal year.

Considering most state agencies saw larger percentage cuts, Chancellor Glen Johnson said he is thankful for what they were received.

By his own admission, author Jon Krakauer is an obsessive guy, and his obsessions often turn into books. His best-sellers include Into the Wild and Into Thin Air, both about man's battle with nature. But his latest book is about a far more intimate struggle. The title lays it out plainly: Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town.

This is the time of year when many high school seniors get their college acceptances and rejections. Some may be dejected that they didn’t get into their first choice school or a school with a stellar reputation.

But as New York Times columnist Frank Bruni writes in his new book, there are many great schools that haven’t been getting the press of a Stanford or MIT or an Ivy League school.

Bruni also questions the validity of current college ranking systems like U.S. News & World Report.

Outstanding student debt is up to $1.2 trillion, a jump of $100 billion from only a year ago.

This week Senator Elizabeth Warren called the ballooning debt unacceptable and proposed a bill that would allow most students to refinance their debt at government subsidized rates, which are now just under four percent.

Most of the students — though saddled with debt — don’t dispute that they are obligated to pay it back. But that’s not the case for 15 students who attended the for-profit Corinthian Colleges around the country.

Chancellor for Higher Education Glen Johnson
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education

Oklahoma higher education officials say proposed budget cuts to the state's college and universities could have devastating consequences for the schools and their students.

Higher Education Chancellor Glen Johnson led a delegation of college officials who outlined the impact of proposed budget cuts Tuesday for members of the Senate Appropriations Committee.

Four state universities offer new programs to make college education more affordable. OU, OSU, Langston University, and USAO have moved to a flat-rate tuition, where students pay one rate regardless of hours taken. OU has also launched a debt-free teacher initiative, in which the school will forgive up to $20,000 in student loan debt if a student agrees to teach in Oklahoma for at least 4 years.

Woman Wins 'Math Nobel' For First Time

Aug 13, 2014

For the first time ever, a woman has won the Fields Medal. Iranian-born Stanford mathematician Maryam Mirzakhani is among the four winners of what is often referred to as the Nobel Prize of mathematics.

“It’s absolutely huge,” Keith Devlin, a mathematician and co-founder and director of Stanford’s H-Star Institute, told Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson of the first female win. “The role model that Maryam represents to young women all over the world is phenomenal.”

Lindsay Whelchel / Oklahoma Watch

The number of out-of-state students attending Oklahoma’s public universities and colleges has more than doubled in just over a decade as schools increasingly rely on nonresident tuition to supplement their budgets.

From 2000 to 2013, the number of nonresident undergraduate students enrolled in public colleges and universities jumped to 22,169 from 10,129, an increase of 119 percent. The nonresidents hail from all 50 states. Nearly half of them are Texans.

In-state enrollment rose by 12 percent, to 135,842, according to data obtained from the State Regents for Higher Education and analyzed by Oklahoma Watch. That rate matched state population growth.

The portion of what colleges call their “educational and general primary budgets” provided by out-of-state tuition also jumped significantly over the 13-year period. The enrollment figures do not include graduate or international students.

Most Oklahoma Colleges And Universities Raise Tuition

Jun 27, 2014
Madeline Stebbins / KGOU

The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education approved tuition and fee increases for 23 of 25 Oklahoma's colleges and universities. School presidents presented their proposed increases before the regents Wednesday.

The average percentage increase for undergraduate resident tuition and mandatory fees is 5.8 percent, according to data provided by the Regents.

State Representative Scott Inman
Oklahoma State Legislature

The Oklahoma House's top Democrat is wants an attorney general's opinion on the constitutionality of a legislative dictate that diverted almost $7.9 million from the Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program.

Democratic Rep. Scott Inman of Del City made the request Wednesday. Inman says he believes it is unconstitutional as well as immoral to reduce funding for the college scholarship program, and that some students in OHLAP won't receive the tuition assistance they were promised.