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immigration

Southwest 29th Street in Oklahoma City.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Customers can smell the bread before they enter Ramiro Padilla’s Mexican bakery and restaurant along Southwest 29th Street in largely-Hispanic south Oklahoma City.

In 2007, the Oklahoma legislature passed a law to crack down on undocumented residents. At the time, Padilla says the Hispanic community panicked. In his neighborhood, the streets were empty.

Raul Font is president of the Latino Community Development Agency in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Immigration dominated the 2016 presidential election, with promises from President-elect Donald Trump to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico, and a clampdown on undocumented migrants from both Latin America and the Middle East.

Mass deportations could have a significant affect on Oklahoma City’s economy, especially south Oklahoma City, where there’s a significant Hispanic population.

State Sen. Brian Crain, R-Tulsa, speaks at a news conference in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2016. At left is Rev. Lori Walke, Mayflower Congregational United Church of Christ.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Business and community leaders in Oklahoma called on Congress Wednesday to pass comprehensive immigration reform.

“We can ask, we can petition, we can do all that we are constitutionally allowed to do,” said state Sen. Brian Crain. His district in Tulsa includes a significant Hispanic population. “I think this is an excellent time for us because the debate is ongoing, and it’s time for us to take action. “There's probably never been a better time - in our lifetimes at least - for us to look at immigration reform."

Milissa Tipton-Dunkins is an immigration attorney in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

When it comes to who becomes the guardian of a minor or an incapacitated person, Oklahoma’s court system has the final say. But a bill by state Sen. Patrick Anderson, R-Enid, would prevent non-citizens from becoming a guardian.

Lori Navarro teaches English as a second language at a high school in Liberal, Kansas. She says she has had several unaccompanied minors in her classroom.
Esther Honig / Harvest Public Media

In the small, rural city of Liberal, Kansas, a neighborhood of old trailer homes sits just off the main street. The small trailer at the end of the block, with faded yellow paint and creaky front steps, is the place 17-year-old Diego now calls home.

(Updated at 11:32 a.m. ET.)

A federal appeals court in New Orleans dealt President Obama a big blow on Monday when it ruled that Obama had overstepped his legal authority in attempting to shield up to 5 million immigrants from deportation.

The Obama administration has vowed to appeal the decision to the Supreme Court.

Rebecca Cruise joins Suzette Grillot to discuss an expansion of government surveillance in France that critics compare to the PATRIOT Act here in the United States, and they talk about African child migrants and draw comparisons to similar issues at the U.S./Mexican border.

Then Rebecca talks with Trinity University political scientist Sussan Siavoshi She's spent her career studying an Iranian cleric who almost became the country's Supreme Leader. They'll also talk about gender issues in the Islamic Republic.

When it comes to energizing Latino voters, a group of young people who can't even vote plays an outsized role.

They are known as DREAMers — undocumented immigrants, brought to the country by their parents when they were kids.They were so named for meeting the requirements under the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act proposal that would have created a pathway to citizenship for them. Now they're a political force.

Joshua Landis discusses Tuesday night’s State of the Union address and President Obama’s proposal to combat the self-proclaimed Islamic State, and Rebecca Cruise provides an update on anti-Islam protests in Leipzig, Germany.

Then Joshua and Suzette Grillot talk with University of Oklahoma sociologist Loretta Bass about first- and second-generation immigrant populations in France, and revisit issues of race and identity.

Protesters in Germany, January 19, 2015
Sozialfotografie [►] StR / Flickr

Strong crowds showed up for anti-Islam rallies in the German cities of Dresden, Leipzig, and Duisburg throughout the month as part of weekly rallies organized by a group called Patriotic Europeans against the Islamization of the West, or PEGIDA.

Protesters have been wearing black ribbons to show their solidarity with the victims last week's terror attacks in Paris.

French flags
Quinn Dombrowski / Flickr

The relationship between racial identity and national identity is a contentious subject in France.

France’s National Assembly voted in 2013 to remove any references to race from national legislation, and French President François Hollande has asserted his belief that racial distinctions have no place in French society.

University of Oklahoma sociologist Loretta Bass calls this attitude toward racial issues the “Ostrich Policy.”

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Oklahoma has joined a multistate lawsuit against President Barack Obama over his executive actions on immigration, Attorney General Scott Pruitt announced Tuesday.

The addition of Arkansas, Michigan, North Dakota and Oklahoma brings to 24 the number of states fighting the order in a federal district court in Brownsville.

Announced last month, the president's unilateral move is designed to spare millions of people living illegally in the United States from deportation. 

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Attorney General Scott Pruitt is adding Oklahoma to the list of 20 states suing President Barack Obama over his executive action to spare from deportation nearly 5 million people living in the U.S. illegally.

Pruitt announced Tuesday that Oklahoma would join the multistate lawsuit filed in federal district court in Texas.

In a statement, Pruitt said the president's executive actions are "unlawful and unconstitutional."

OversightAndReform / Flickr Creative Commons

President Obama says he understands some Republicans disagree there’s a need to fix immigration laws, but U.S. Rep. and Senator-elect James Lankford (R-Okla. 5) says his party has offered to work with the president for nearly two years.

Joshua Landis provides an update on airstrikes in Syria and Iraq, and U.S. strategy to combat the Islamic State.

Later, a conversation with Akash Patel, the founder and executive director of the Aspiring Americans Initiative. His Oklahoma City-based non-profit works to connect undocumented students with educational opportunities.

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