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Internet

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the potential for a peace agreement between the Colombian government and the FARC rebel group, and the expanding U.S. and NATO military presence in central and eastern Europe.

Then, Suzette talks with Laura DeNardis. She’s an expert the global dynamics of internet governance, and we’ll talk about the development of the Domain Name System, or DNS, and the management of IP addresses.

dark keyboard and mouse
Michael Schreifels / Flickr

Cars, drones, refrigerators – almost everything is connected to the internet in some way, and that raises significant questions about control and governance. Who’s in charge, and who sets standards?

American University communications professor Laura DeNardis has studied these issues since the modern internet’s infancy in the 1990s. She told KGOU’s World Views countries, industry, and civil society work together in what she called “multi-stakeholder governance.”

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss this week's lockdown in Belgium due to security concerns after terrorist attacks in Pairs earlier this month, and the response of the citizens in Brussels.

Then Suzette talks with cybersecurity expert and former White House advisor Melissa Hathaway. She says security or resilience weren’t concerns as the Internet became a key component of the nation’s infrastructure.

illuminated keyboard
Jeroen Bennink / Flickr

For the past quarter century, communications technology has evolved and grown the point where practically every business, service, and family platform is connected to the internet.

But that interconnectivity was approached from a from a commercial development approach, according to cybersecurity expert Melissa Hathaway. That means the first-to-market, free market approach means security and resilience weren’t concerns as the internet was embedded in critical infrastructure.

President Obama speaking to supporters in a pipe yard in Cushing, Okla. in 2012, where the Keystone XL Pipeline connects on its way from Canada to the Gulf Coast.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

President Obama travels to Oklahoma Wednesday where he will announce a new initiative to expand broadband access to homes in low-income areas.

The president will make the announcement at Durant High School in the capital of the Choctaw Nation in southeastern Oklahoma.

Obama’s ConnectHome initiative will expand broadband coverage to 275,000 low income households in 27 cities and the Choctaw Nation. The White House estimates it’ll bring broadband into the homes of nearly 200,000 low income children.

Rebecca and Suzette Grillot talk about protests in Hong Kong on the anniversary of the handover back to China, and remember Nicholas Winton, a British humanitarian who rescued more than 600 children during the Holocaust. He died Wednesday at the age of 106.

Rebecca Cruise talks with journalist and activist Rebecca MacKinnon about information freedom in the digital age. The Internet allows people to organize politically and instantly share information across the globe. But an open web isn’t always guaranteed.

dark keyboard and mouse
Michael Schreifels / Flickr

When President Obama signed the USA Freedom Act last month, he said the measure would “strengthen civil liberty safeguards” in government surveillance programs. The Freedom Act includes reformed provisions from the PATRIOT Act and was meant reign in government surveillance activities.

Federal Trade Commission Chairwoman Edith Ramirez raised a red flag over Internet privacy at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas this week.

Ramirez said “smart home” hacking would be a growing problem this year, as consumers increasingly connect everyday objects to the Internet.

Rebecca Cruise explains how a proposed internet tax drew tens of thousands of Hungarians to the streets of Budapest in protest, and Joshua Landis provides an update on a victory by secularists in Tunisia’s elections.

Later, a discussion with Oklahoma City imam Imad Enchassi. As a child in Lebanon’s refugee camps, he witnessed the massacre of thousands of his fellow Palestinians. Suzette Grillot talks about humanitarian work in the Middle East with Enchassi and Oklahoma City University political scientist Mohamed Daadoui.

Hungary Internet Tax Shelved After Mass Protests

Oct 31, 2014
Hungary's prime minister Viktor Orban at a European People's Party summit in Brussels, October 2014
European People's Party / Flickr Creative Commons

Prime Minister Viktor Orban cancelled plans to tax internet usage in Hungary on Friday after mass protests across the country.

The protests began in Budapest on Sunday as tens of thousands of Hungarians flooded the streets of the capital.

The proposed measure would have taxed internet usage at a rate 150 Hungarian forint, or about 60 cents, per gigabyte of data. After this week’s initial protests, Orban announced a monthly tax cap of 700 forint, or about $3.00, per internet subscription for individuals and 5,000 forint, or about $20.00, for companies.

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