James Lankford

U.S. Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) speaking during a July 28, 2015 Students for Life rally at the U.S. Capitol.
Provided / U.S. Sen. James Lankford

Updated July 30, 12:01 p.m.

Republican U.S. Senators discussed legislation Wednesday that would block federal money from going to Planned Parenthood and send those funds to other organizations that provide healthcare services for women.

Planned Parenthood is under scrutiny after videos surfaced that allegedly show doctors talking about selling fetal tissues. The organization’s leadership says Planned Parenthood does not profit from fetal tissue donations. 

OversightAndReform / Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. Sen. James Lankford is introducing a bill to end all taxpayer funding for Planned Parenthood unless the organization stops performing all abortions.

Lankford announced Wednesday he has introduced the Defund Planned Parenthood Act, which would impose a one-year moratorium on federal funding to the organization unless it stops providing abortions.

Planned Parenthood provides a variety of non-abortion health services, including health screenings, family planning and adoption referrals at several clinics in Oklahoma.

U.S. Sen. James Lankford speaking on the Senate floor July 16 about ending taxpayer funding for Planned Parenthood in light of a recent undercover video.
YouTube

U.S. Sen. James Lankford delivered a speech on the chamber's floor Thursday calling on Congress to end taxpayer funding to Planned Parenthood.

The remarks came in response to the release of an undercover video made by anti-abortion activists. It shows the organization's senior director of medical services discussing procedures for providing fetal body parts to researchers.

U.S. Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) / Flickr

Last week the National Counterterrorism Center, the FBI, and the Department of Homeland Security released a bulletin listing the July 4 holiday weekend as a possible target for terrorist attacks.

U.S. Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) speaking about the upcoming King vs. Burwell Supreme Court decision Monday on the floor of the U.S. Senate.
SenatorLankford / YouTube

U.S. Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) says he thinks the Supreme Court likely will rule federal Affordable Care Act subsidies are unconstitutional in the 34 states without state insurance exchanges.

The Supreme Court will decide the King vs. Burwell case sometime between now and Monday, June 29.

OversightAndReform / Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. Sen. James Lankford is scheduled to deliver his first formal address on the floor of the U.S. Senate.

The first-term Republican plans to give his maiden floor speech at 10 a.m. central time on Thursday.

Lankford says his speech will focus on challenges that lie ahead for America and how the nation can address them.

He is an advocate for streamlining federal government, especially simplifying the federal tax code, and has been a fierce critic of the new federal health care law.

Oklahoma's longest-serving Congressman led the state's delegation on the House floor in Washington Thursday to reflect on the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing as the 20th anniversary approaches.

U.S. Rep. Frank Lucas was a freshman lawmaker representing Oklahoma's now-defunct Sixth Congressional District that included downtown Oklahoma City.

U.S. Senator James Lankford (R-Okla.)
Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. Senator James Lankford probably won’t vote in favor of the confirmation of Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch.

The Republican from Oklahoma lauded Lynch’s work as the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, but her statements on immigration have raised some concerns for him.

U.S. Sen. James Lankford  says the budget proposal President Obama unveiled Monday doesn't address the drivers of the country's debt or encourage private sector growth.

Lankford said in a statement Monday the executive budget doesn't respect discretionary sequestration caps, and called the 7 percent increase in federal spending "reckless."

"That would be the equivalent to someone who's having a tough time making their credit car payments, but when they get a job, or when they get a raise, they say, 'Great. I got a raise. I'm going to buy a brand-new TV for the Super Bowl tonight, and put even more on my credit card,' instead of paying down debt," Lankford told Fox News' Shannon Bream during a wide-ranging interview that also focused on the U.S. response to self-proclaimed Islamic State militants. "If the economy’s doing better, terrific. Let’s start paying down debt. Let’s get us back into balance, not just accelerate and keep spending more.”

President Obama delivers his annual State of the Union address Tuesday night before a joint session of Congress.
The White House / Twitter

Most of Oklahoma’s Congressional delegation and executive leadership criticized President Obama’s annual State of the Union address Tuesday night – some even before the speech took place.

Gov. Mary Fallin says Obama can achieve his goal of improving the economic conditions of the middle class by relying on the energy sector to grow the economy and raise per-capita income.

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