KGOU

John Bennett

A small group of protestors, who did not want to give their names, stand outside the state Capitol during the first-ever Muslim Day in Oklahoma City, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Chamber of Commerce officials from Oklahoma's two largest cities told lawmakers Wednesday focusing on social issues can harm economic development in the state.

Tulsa Regional Chamber Senior Vice President of Economic Development Brien Thorstenberg told House and Senate members who gathered for a joint interim study that his organization constantly receives phone calls from businesses about Oklahoma's stance on issues like North Carolina's bathroom bill and Indiana's Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

Provided

State Rep. John Bennett, R-Sallisaw, plans to file legislation next year that would prohibit terrorist organizations from operating in Oklahoma, but he didn't offer specifics on what that might look like.

The retired U.S. Marine and former police officer led an interim study Tuesday in the House Judiciary and Civil Procedure Committee to discuss Islam, Shariah Law, the Muslim Brotherhood, and the radicalization process, the study states:

Oklahoma City University professor of Islamic Studies and Islamic Society of Greater Oklahoma City Imam Imad Enchassi  speaking during a September 17 press conference in Oklahoma City.
Ben Fenwick / KGOU

Muslim, Christian and Jewish community leaders held a press conference Wednesday in front of the state Republican Party headquarters in Oklahoma City.

The speakers condemned comments by state Rep. John Bennett (R-Sallisaw), who earlier this week called Muslims "a cancer in our nation that needs to be cut out."

State Rep. John Bennett's (R-Sallisaw) Facebook post about Muslim-Americans.
Facebook

The Oklahoma chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations wants state Rep. John Bennett (R-Sallisaw) to apologize for saying people should be wary of those who are “Muslim American” in a Facebook post.

State Rep. John Bennett (R-Sallisaw)
Provided / Oklahoma House of Representatives

An eastern Oklahoma legislator is pushing a bill that would allow for more Ten Commandments monuments on public grounds and buildings.

The bill filed this week by Sallisaw Republican Rep. John Bennett authorizes schools, cities and counties to display monuments or memorials dedicated to "historical documents."

The bill specifically references the Ten Commandments, U.S. Constitution, Bill of Rights and Magna Carta, among others.