KGOU

Behind the scenes at KGOU

You better start practicing the required response to Michael Feldman’s weekly question, “Whad’ya know?” Of course the answer is “not much, you?”

Michael Feldman’s “Whad’Ya Know” will be live from Oklahoma City on Saturday, October 25th with the broadcast starting at 10 a.m.

“Whad’Ya Know?” will be at the Oklahoma City Community College Visual and Performing Arts Center Theater. Tickets are now open to KGOU listeners who have the secret code.

KGOU On iTunes Radio

Jul 27, 2014

It sure seems as if the world is moving faster and faster!  And now, the opportunity to listen to KGOU in digital spaces has just increased.

KGOU now has our audio stream as a station inside iTunes Radio!

If you are already an iTunes customer, and if you have iTunes installed on your desktop, your iPad or iPhone, then you can listen to KGOU in iTunes Radio.  Simply go to the radio area, and search for KGOU. Then you make it your favorite by adding it to your personal “My Stations” list.

Kate Carlton / The Oklahoma Tornado Project

Earlier this week, KGOU's Oklahoma Tornado Project and the Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center hosted an opening reception for the exhibit "Not Just Another Day in May" at Leadership Square in Downtown Oklahoma City. A few of the photographers who have work featured in the exhibit were there to talk to listeners about the images. 

KGOU staff
Jolly Brown / KGOU

KGOU and a journalism cooperative it leads, StateImpact Oklahoma, combined to sweep several categories of awards presented by the Society of Professional Journalists' Oklahoma Pro Chapter. The journalists' organization also honored KGOU General Manager Karen Holp as its Teacher of the Year for her work as adjunct faculty for the University of Oklahoma's Gaylord College of Journalism, teaching students who produce a program broadcast on KGOU.

numerals collage
Flickr Creative Commons

Like most non-profits, KGOU relies on volunteers during the busiest times of the year -- specifically, during our membership drives. We have great volunteers, and we'd like to add to their numbers -- the more, the merrier! We have a good time, even though it does get really busy sometimes.

Here's your chance to help out KGOU and the greater listening community. And so, without further ado and with my tongue firmly planted in my cheek, here are our top ten reasons to sign up now:

The other day, I wrote a post about a cartoonist, Connie Sun, and her thoughts about animals. Her mom heard about it, and called Connie to say "Yea!" and then, because she's an honest woman, she asked, "What is NPR?" Here's what happened next:

I have this conversation all the time. So many people are not aware that NPR writes things, "posts" things. But we are spreading the word. (Going from "What is NPR?" to "NPR is blogs?" — that's progress, I think. No?)

Jeffrey Beall / Flickr Creative Commons

At 27, I’m one of the younger members of the KGOU staff. I started my career in public radio at KGOU at 19, while still very much a naïve college student. Working on the campus of the University of Oklahoma, sometimes it feels like I never left college.

Fortunately, if you never leave higher education, you never stop learning. Public radio stimulates my curiosity, and teaches me something new every single day. In this 21st Century fast-paced digital landscape, a conversation that once opened with “I heard it on KGOU…” has been replaced with a text message that usually starts with “TIL” (for “Today I Learned…”).

That thirst for knowledge is quenched every day by what I hear on KGOU. 

Jim Johnson

As a junior attending the University of Oklahoma in 1991, “self” was very much my focus. I had time for little else, it seemed. After all, I was working hard to finance my way through school (and life) and wondering what my place in this world would be once I graduated when an opportunity to actually gain some experience in broadcasting came about.

Manish Rai Jain / Flickr Creative Commons

Yes, I'm really going to compare public radio to a suspension bridge. They're very similar, don't you think?

And not just in the obvious ways.

It's easy to see that like a suspension bridge, public radio is a connector between communities, a way to get from Here to There, a conduit for the free exchange between points -- geographic or intellectual -- that seemed forever destined to be separated.

Tim Berry / timberry.bplans.com

This is from the Manager’s Desk.

For KGOU’s 30th anniversary year, I want to share a bit about KGOU’s financial picture this fiscal year and do a quick comparison to the past.

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