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law enforcement

Law enforcement has captured all four inmates who escaped from the Lincoln County Jail early Monday morning. United States Marshals apprehended the final escapee, 23-year-old Brian Allen Moody, in Lincoln County on Thursday.

The other three inmates, 41-year-old Sonny Baker, 31-year-old Jeremy Tyson Irvin and 27-year-old Trey Goodnight were captured on Wednesday morning.

This post was updated on June 15, 2017 at 4:40 p.m.

Original post:

Oklahoma City Police Department

With less money from the state and bounced-check funds drying up, Oklahoma district attorneys are turning to issuing tickets and putting people on probation through their offices – activities typically left to police, counties and the Department of Corrections.

Their newest effort that yields revenue is to crack down on uninsured drivers using a system that scans the license plates of hundreds of thousands of Oklahomans on roadways every year.

Oklahoma City Police Chief Bill Citty
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma City’s police union, the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 123, is pushing the city’s police department to put more officers on the streets.

Josh Cantwell, Grand Lake Mental Health Center adult services administrator, demonstrates how the organization's iPad program works to help clients access treatment.
Clifton Adcock / Oklahoma Watch

 

Patricia Tompkins wanted help for her son, Eric Tompkins.

Eric, 41, of Ardmore, was suffering from severe depression, according to statements made online by Patricia and other members of Eric’s family. On the morning of Aug. 8, 2015, she suspected he had attempted to kill himself by drinking roach poison.

Oklahoma Watch

At least two Oklahoma law enforcement agencies possess or have used a controversial device, shrouded in secrecy, to track and collect information from cellphones, an Oklahoma Watch investigation found.

The devices, often referred to as “cell site simulators,” are controversial because they collect information not only from criminal suspects, but also potentially from scores of other surrounding cellphone owners who have no idea the data is being gathered.

State courts are twice as likely to incarcerate Native teens for minor crimes such as truancy and alcohol use than any other racial and ethnic group, according to the Tribal Law and Policy Institute. And juvenile detention facilities around the country have a disproportionately high number of Native American youth, according to an Indian Law and Order Commission report.

There are roughly 4,000 people who serve as reserve police officers and sheriff’s deputies across the state of Oklahoma. Many hold full-time civilian day jobs and volunteer for agencies in their free time.

The role of these volunteers has come under increased scrutiny after a Tulsa County reserve deputy killed a restrained man last month. KGOU’s Kate Carlton Greer reports.

Anna Vignet / Reveal

In part 2 of Reveal’s in-depth look at law and disorder, we expose some of the tensions between police and the communities they serve and how video cameras are dramatically changing the public’s relationship with law enforcement.

Listen to the program

As cases in Madison, Wisc., Baltimore, Md., Ferguson, Mo. and elsewhere in the U.S. are stirring the debate over the proper use of police force, one of the police chiefs that has been tapped by states and the federal government to help improve community-police relations and work toward reform is Richmond, Calif.’s Chris Magnus.

Bob Ball is a real estate investor in Portland, Ore., but that's just his day job. For the past 20 years, he has also been a volunteer cop.

"When I was new, it was the best time of my life. I got to go out there and wear a white hat and help people and make a difference in my community, one little piece at a time," Ball says. "That's a very, very fulfilling thing to do."

This is real police work. On one occasion, Ball had to pull his gun on a guy threatening a woman with a knife.

Over the past few months, a light has been shined on the African-American man’s experience, especially in relation to law enforcement.

Throughout the conversation, much attention has been given to statistics: how many African-American men go to jail, graduate high school and go to college.

Many of these statistics reflect African-American men’s experiences in a negative light, but what if the statistics focused on their positive accomplishments?

Oklahoma Representative George Young, District 99, D-Oklahoma City
Oklahoma House of Representatives

State police officers would go through increased racial sensitivity and diversity training if a bill filed for this session is approved by lawmakers.

HB2047, by Rep. George Young, D-Oklahoma City, would require the Council on Law Enforcement Education and Training to, by Jan. 1, 2016, to include a number of requirements.

The bill requires basic training courses for law enforcement certification to include a minimum of four hours of diversity training and racial sensitivity education.

Families Want Federal Investigations Into Black Men's Deaths

Sep 25, 2014

The families of Michael Brown, the 18-year-old who was shot last month by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo., and Eric Garner, who died in July after being placed in a chokehold by an officer in New York, called on the Justice Department to take the lead in the investigations into the two deaths.

Paul L. McCord Jr. / Flickr.com

More than 100 Tulsa police vehicles have yet to be outfitted with dashboard cameras four years after the process of installing them began.

The project began in 2010 after officials agreed to pay more than $4 million to purchase and install cameras in all police vehicles as part of the settlement of a long-running racial discrimination lawsuit against the city.