The Oklahoma Supreme Court in 2015: Standing (Left to Right): Vice-Chief Justice Douglas L. Combs Justice James E. Edmondson, Justice Steven W. Taylor, Justice Noma Gurich. Sitting (Left to Right): Justice Joseph M. Watt, Chief Justice John F. Reif, Just
Oklahoma State Courts Network

The Oklahoma Supreme Court has decided to consider whether two oil companies can be held liable for injuries a Prague woman suffered during a 2011 earthquake.

The lawsuit by Sandra Ladra of Prague is among dozens of lawsuits filed in the past several years across the country alleging oil and gas companies are responsible for earthquakes.

Similar lawsuits seeking class-action status have been filed against energy companies in Arkansas and Texas.

Oklahoma Department of Corrections

Oklahoma death row inmates who have sued to block their executions under existing lethal injection protocols want a federal judge to allow their lawsuit to move forward.

Attorneys for the inmates filed paperwork in federal court Wednesday opposing the state's request to put the lawsuit on hold.

The Oklahoma Attorney General's Office has asked that the case be stayed, arguing that drugs and procedures used to execute a death row inmate in a botched lethal injection in April do not risk violating the constitutional rights of other death row inmates.


Update 3:15pm: see NPR's story about another court decision that affirms the federal health care law, saying the state exchanges set up by the federal government can offer subsidies to people who purchase insurance through those subsidies.


Oklahoma state capitol
LLudo / Flickr Creative Commons

An attorney says the Oklahoma Legislature engaged in "unprecedented expansion" of its authority when it passed legislation repealing Common Core education standards for English and math.

Attorney Robert McCampbell made the comments Tuesday during oral arguments before the state Supreme Court in a lawsuit that alleges the legislation is unconstitutional.

Sam Felder /

Recent court decisions in Wisconsin and Arkansas regarding voter ID laws have given heart to a Tulsa woman who is challenging Oklahoma's voter ID law.

University of Tulsa law professor Jim Thomas represents Tulsan Delilah Christine Gentges in a case now before an Oklahoma County District Court. The Tulsa World reports that the lawsuit has followed a winding trail that has taken it from Tulsa County District Court to the Oklahoma Supreme Court and now to Oklahoma County.

2005 Toyota Camry
Bull-Doser / Wikimedia Commons

An Oklahoma judge says a settlement to award punitive damages has been reached in a case that blamed sudden acceleration in a Toyota Camry for a wrongful death.

The jury found Toyota Motor Corp. liable Thursday for a fatal crash and awarded $1.5 million compensation to Jean Bookout, the driver injured in the crash, and $1.5 million to the family of Barbara Schwarz, who died.

The jury also decided that Toyota acted with "reckless disregard" for the rights of others.