KGOU

live music

The Wormy Dog Saloon at 311 E. Sheridan Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

A Bricktown music venue that has showcased many red dirt and up-and-coming country artists is closing its doors.

The Wormy Dog Saloon will close at the end of April. Levelland Productions, which leases the venue, informed the property’s owner, Brewer Entertainment, in December that they will not renew their lease.

The Zoo Amphitheatre at 2101 NE 50th St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Two months ago Oklahoma City opened The Criterion, a new 3,500-seat theater in Bricktown. The venue has has already seen concerts by My Morning Jacket, Grace Potter, and most recently, Sturgill Simpson this past Wednesday evening. Later this year the Tower Theatre will open in Uptown, and there’s going to be an outdoor patio for concerts west of downtown.

But these are all indoor venues. Oklahoma City only has two large outdoor amphitheaters – The Zoo Amp, and Frontier City – both in the northeast part of the city.

When asked what constitutes a life well spent, Will Rogers once answered, “Love and admiration from your fellow men is all that anyone can ask.” 

In April 2011, Oklahoma-born musician, Beau Jennings shared with KGOU his admiration for Rogers, and an ambitious desire to pay musical tribute to his "boyhood hero." Friday marks the consummation of at least part of Jennings’ pursuit - an album release concert featuring material from The Verdigris. 

A worker repairs a sign above the Chevy Bricktown Events Center in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Reocrd

There's no shortage of large and small live music venues across Oklahoma.

In Oklahoma City, the owners of the Wormy Dog Saloon in Bricktown told The Journal Record's Molly Fleming they're partnering with a Colorado investor to open a 4,200-person venue sometime late next year. But some promoters are concerned.

www.mattstansberry.com

Matt Stansberry’s latest project offers a sound that is both familiar and fresh - which is no small feat.

The ten-plus member band delivers this exoteric rhythm and blues-meets-modern pop vibe by way of layered horns, dual guitars, keys/organ, a ‘pocket’ rhythm section and sassy, backing vocals. 

It's a potent mixture. And the group’s sophomore release, Crash Landing, offers a little extra appeal for star-crossed lovers and all who’ve felt a touch of life’s blues.

Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey (Brian Haas - left, Chris Combs - center, Josh Raymer - right)
Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey / JFJO.com

Brian Haas has his own theory of relativity: Spending so much of his life in a van over the past twenty years has actually “folded time and space.” 

“I’ve been moving faster and getting closer to the speed of light, which means time has been going by quicker, right?” Haas says.

2014 marks the 20th Anniversary of the Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey, a band Haas took under his wing while attending the University of Tulsa. 

“I really just wanted to learn how to play jazz,” Haas says. “And then it just took on a life of its own.”

grahamcoltonmusic.com

Recapturing one’s youth is the promise of many potions and product makers.  But, for Oklahoma-born musician Graham Colton, the desire to reclaim the past had nothing to do with appearances.

At the same time the 32 year-old matured as a successful entertainer, Colton longed for that feeling he enjoyed some twelve years ago when it was all brand new. It’s a goal he seems to have achieved while working on the material for his new, self-produced album Lonely Ones.

Shannon H / Flickr Creative Commons

Oklahoma City native Graham Colton performs before a hometown crowd at Bricktown Music Hall March 29 at 8 p.m.

The concert marks the debut of original material from his recently recorded album Lonely Ones, released this past January. Colton’s Lonely Ones was inspired by collaborations with Wayne Coyne and Steven Drozd, members of the famed Oklahoma City group The Flaming Lips.

Norman Native Performs Mozart With OKC Phil

Feb 28, 2014
Robert Muller

Grammy-nominated and Norman native, harpist, Yolanda Kondonassis performs with the Oklahoma City Philharmonic at 8 p.m. March 1 at the Civic Center.

The program will features Kondonassis performinig Mozart’s Concerto for Flute and Harp in C Major, K.299 with flutist Marina Piccinini. The program will also include Mahler’s Symphony No. 1 both under the direction of Joel Levine.

Kondonassis says performing for a “hometown” crowd is fun because she sees friends and others she knows.

Lindsey B / Flickr Creative Commons

Late silver screen legend Katharine Hepburn once reportedly reminisced, “What you see before you, my friend, is the result of a lifetime of chocolate.” Well, February 1 at the National Center of Employee Development (NCED), Norman’s Firehouse Art Center produces the chocolate feast of a lifetime.