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Mary Fallin

Does State Have Plans If Thousands Lose Health Insurance?

Jun 13, 2015
ok.gov

Gov. Mary Fallin’s office won’t say if the state has a plan to help thousands of Oklahomans projected to lose their health insurance if their subsidies are struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court this month.

Oklahoma State Capitol
mrlaugh / Flickr

The 55th Oklahoma Legislature wrapped up its first session a little over two weeks ago on May 22, one week ahead of the constitutionally required deadline to adjourn.

Lawmakers passed bond issues for widely publicized museums in both Oklahoma City and Tulsa. But the $611 million shortfall in the state budget dominated the conversation from January to May, even though details of the $7.1 billion agreement didn't emerge until shortly before the gavel fell. To plug that gap, lawmakers cut most agency budgets by five to seven percent, and also used monies from the state's Rainy Day Fund and state agency revolving accounts.

Gov. Mary Fallin reads to children on the lawn of the governor's mansion in Oklahoma City in September 2012.
Governor Mary Fallin / Facebook

Gov. Mary Fallin signed a slew of education-related bills Wednesday. The five new laws are aimed at improving education in Oklahoma.

Potentially the most controversial of the laws is Senate Bill 630, which deals with the third grade reading test. The law allows reading teams to promote a child to the fourth grade on a probationary basis despite a low score on their test. If it hadn’t passed, students who scored low on the test, and did not meet an exemption, would have automatically been held back.  

Gov. Mary Fallin delivers her 2015 State of the State address on Feb. 2, 2015.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin has signed a $7.1 billion budget bill to fund state government and services in the upcoming year. 

The general appropriations measure that Fallin signed Monday provides funding for state agencies for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

The measure was approved by the House and Senate in the final days of the 2015 Oklahoma Legislature, which adjourned on May 22. Fallin praised lawmakers for closing a $611 million shortfall without cutting funding for public education.

Aerial footage of floodwaters covering Alameda Street as it crosses Lake Thunderbird in far east Norman on May 24, 2015.
Lawrence McEwen / YouTube

Gov. Mary Fallin has directed the Oklahoma Department of Transportation to speed up bidding on county infrastructure projects and find more ways to support recovery efforts in light of widespread damage after flooding throughout the month of May.

Fallin says some state lawmakers have asked her to redirect money from Oklahoma's Rainy Day Fund to county infrastructure projects, which she doesn't have the legal authority to do.

ok.gov

Gov. Mary Fallin has vetoed two bills, including a Senate bill that requires the state to develop a plan to comply with Environmental Protection Agency rules regarding carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants.

In a veto message issued Friday, Fallin said the bill conflicts with an executive order she issued on Tuesday that prohibits the state from developing an implementation plan.

ok.gov

Gov. Mary Fallin has signed into law bills regarding a budgeting system for state agencies and for charter schools.

Fallin on Friday signed a bill requiring state agencies use what is called performance-informed budgeting techniques. Fallin had made the system one of her legislative priorities.

The process calls for the agencies to set goals and outcomes that can be measured for their success.

The second new law gives school districts statewide the option of creating charter schools. Current law allows charter schools only in Oklahoma and Tulsa counties.

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Gov. Mary Fallin has signed legislation that makes Oklahoma the 15th state in the nation to permit terminally ill patients to have access to experimental medications and procedures that are being used in clinical trials but are not yet on pharmacy shelves.

The measure, known as the Right to Try Act, was among 57 bills Fallin signed into law Tuesday.

A classroom at the damaged Southgate-Rippetoe Elementary School in Moore, that took a direct hit during Wednesday's tornado.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Updated April 8, 7:31 a.m.: SBA loans available

The U.S. Small Business Administration has announced that low-interest federal disaster loans are available to Oklahoma businesses and residents affected by the severe storms that raked parts of the state last month.

Tuesday's disaster declaration makes SBA assistance available in Canadian, Cleveland, Creek, Grady, McClain, Oklahoma, Okmulgee, Osage, Pawnee, Pottawatomie, Rogers, Tulsa, Wagoner and Washington counties.

Fallin’s Office Didn’t Release Records Sought in Past 11 Months

Mar 15, 2015
Gov. Mary Fallin and other state leaders observe a PowerPoint presentation of revenue projections.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Until Friday, Gov. Mary Fallin’s office had not released records requested in the previous 11 months by members of the news media and other groups, according to her office’s catalog of Open Records Act requests.

oksenate.gov

Oklahoma's governor would have broad new powers to appoint the directors of ten different state entities under a bill narrowly passed by a Senate committee.

The Senate General Government Committee voted 5-4 on Monday for the bill by Broken Arrow Republican Sen. Nathan Dahm, despite concerns it gives the governor too much power. Dahm says he expects the bill to be rewritten.

The bill calls for the heads of ten different state agencies and boards to be fired effective Jan. 1 and allows the governor to name their replacement.

Office Of The Governor

Several Republican governors, including Mary Fallin, are urging GOP congressional leaders to stand firm against legislation funding the Department of Homeland Security if the bill doesn't also overturn President Barack Obama's executive action on immigration.

Governors in both parties in Washington this weekend warned of economic and security concerns should Congress fail to resolve its latest budget standoff. 

Homeland Security's $40 billion budget runs out Feb. 27, giving federal lawmakers only a few days to reach an agreement once they return from recess next week.

State agencies are being asked to return to the Capitol to have an in-depth discussion about their budgets, the leaders of the House and the Senate said Thursday. The meetings to discuss budgets are a result of the $611 million dollar shortfall authorized by the State Equalization Board last Tuesday.

Gov. Mary Fallin has called on President Obama to approve construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline that would carry oil from Canada to the Texas Gulf Coast.

A portion of the pipeline from Cushing to the Gulf Coast is complete and operating, however the northern portion requires presidential approval because it crosses an international border.

Gov. Mary Fallin during her 2015 State of the State address Feb. 2, 2015.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Updated at 8:25 a.m.

Gov. Mary Fallin has imposed a moratorium on hiring and pay raises for state workers.

Fallin issued an executive order Monday that tightens hiring and wage adjustment practices for employees at all state agencies. The hiring freeze and pay raise moratorium does not affect common or higher education employees.

madpoet_one / Flickr Creative Commons

The Oklahoma House has approved prescription drug monitoring legislation that is one of Gov. Mary Fallin's top priorities for the 2015 Legislature.

House members voted 64-30 for the measure Monday and sent it to the Senate for debate and a vote. The bill was approved without opposition last week by the House Alcohol, Tobacco and Controlled Substances Committee.

The measure by Republican Rep. Doug Cox of Grove requires health care providers to consult a prescription drug repository before prescribing or refilling opiates and a variety of other narcotics.

Governor Fallin Signs Executive Orders

Feb 7, 2015
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Governor Mary Fallin signed an executive order that carries forward 24 executive orders from her and previous administrations and eliminates dozens of others.

The governor decided not to renew nearly 70 executive orders, some of which date back 56 years. Many of the orders not being renewed deal with outdated policies and agencies or are inconsistent with federal law.

Thirteen of the 24 executive orders renewed were issued by Fallin. They include:

  • Prohibiting the use of tobacco products on all properties owned, leased or contracted for use by the state of Oklahoma.
  • Prohibiting the use of electronic cigarette or vaping devices on all properties owned, leased or contracted for use by the state of Oklahoma, excluding residents at state veterans homes.
  • Requiring state agencies to submit an electronic copy of proposed permanent rules to the governor and the appropriate Cabinet secretary.
  • Designating Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb as Oklahoma's small business advocate.

Gov. Mary Fallin delivers the 2014 State of the State address as Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb and House Speaker T.W. Shannon (R-Lawton) look on - February 3, 2014.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin will unveil her executive budget proposal Monday afternoon as she delivers her annual State of the State address to members of the GOP-controlled House and Senate.

With sliding oil prices expected to deepen an already-projected $300 million hole in next year's budget, Fallin told the Oklahoma Public Media Exchange's Michael Cross lawmakers will have to be creative as they attempt to balance a growing list of demands for state resources with a dwindling amount of available revenue.

President Obama delivers his annual State of the Union address Tuesday night before a joint session of Congress.
The White House / Twitter

Most of Oklahoma’s Congressional delegation and executive leadership criticized President Obama’s annual State of the Union address Tuesday night – some even before the speech took place.

Gov. Mary Fallin says Obama can achieve his goal of improving the economic conditions of the middle class by relying on the energy sector to grow the economy and raise per-capita income.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin has issued an executive order creating a special committee to develop reforms to how the state handles nonviolent offenders who have substance abuse problems and mental health issues.

Fallin issued the order Wednesday creating the six-member Oklahoma Justice Reform Steering Committee.

The committee will develop a plan for implementing justice reform measures tailored to Oklahoma's security needs and budget and prioritize ways to reduce prison overcrowding and promote public safety.

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