Mary Fallin


Gov. Mary Fallin has signed legislation that makes Oklahoma the 15th state in the nation to permit terminally ill patients to have access to experimental medications and procedures that are being used in clinical trials but are not yet on pharmacy shelves.

The measure, known as the Right to Try Act, was among 57 bills Fallin signed into law Tuesday.

A classroom at the damaged Southgate-Rippetoe Elementary School in Moore, that took a direct hit during Wednesday's tornado.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Updated April 8, 7:31 a.m.: SBA loans available

The U.S. Small Business Administration has announced that low-interest federal disaster loans are available to Oklahoma businesses and residents affected by the severe storms that raked parts of the state last month.

Tuesday's disaster declaration makes SBA assistance available in Canadian, Cleveland, Creek, Grady, McClain, Oklahoma, Okmulgee, Osage, Pawnee, Pottawatomie, Rogers, Tulsa, Wagoner and Washington counties.

Fallin’s Office Didn’t Release Records Sought in Past 11 Months

Mar 15, 2015
Gov. Mary Fallin and other state leaders observe a PowerPoint presentation of revenue projections.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Until Friday, Gov. Mary Fallin’s office had not released records requested in the previous 11 months by members of the news media and other groups, according to her office’s catalog of Open Records Act requests.

Oklahoma's governor would have broad new powers to appoint the directors of ten different state entities under a bill narrowly passed by a Senate committee.

The Senate General Government Committee voted 5-4 on Monday for the bill by Broken Arrow Republican Sen. Nathan Dahm, despite concerns it gives the governor too much power. Dahm says he expects the bill to be rewritten.

The bill calls for the heads of ten different state agencies and boards to be fired effective Jan. 1 and allows the governor to name their replacement.

Office Of The Governor

Several Republican governors, including Mary Fallin, are urging GOP congressional leaders to stand firm against legislation funding the Department of Homeland Security if the bill doesn't also overturn President Barack Obama's executive action on immigration.

Governors in both parties in Washington this weekend warned of economic and security concerns should Congress fail to resolve its latest budget standoff. 

Homeland Security's $40 billion budget runs out Feb. 27, giving federal lawmakers only a few days to reach an agreement once they return from recess next week.

State agencies are being asked to return to the Capitol to have an in-depth discussion about their budgets, the leaders of the House and the Senate said Thursday. The meetings to discuss budgets are a result of the $611 million dollar shortfall authorized by the State Equalization Board last Tuesday.

Gov. Mary Fallin has called on President Obama to approve construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline that would carry oil from Canada to the Texas Gulf Coast.

A portion of the pipeline from Cushing to the Gulf Coast is complete and operating, however the northern portion requires presidential approval because it crosses an international border.

Gov. Mary Fallin during her 2015 State of the State address Feb. 2
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Updated at 8:25 a.m.

Gov. Mary Fallin has imposed a moratorium on hiring and pay raises for state workers.

Fallin issued an executive order Monday that tightens hiring and wage adjustment practices for employees at all state agencies. The hiring freeze and pay raise moratorium does not affect common or higher education employees.

madpoet_one / Flickr Creative Commons

The Oklahoma House has approved prescription drug monitoring legislation that is one of Gov. Mary Fallin's top priorities for the 2015 Legislature.

House members voted 64-30 for the measure Monday and sent it to the Senate for debate and a vote. The bill was approved without opposition last week by the House Alcohol, Tobacco and Controlled Substances Committee.

The measure by Republican Rep. Doug Cox of Grove requires health care providers to consult a prescription drug repository before prescribing or refilling opiates and a variety of other narcotics.

Governor Fallin Signs Executive Orders

Feb 7, 2015

Governor Mary Fallin signed an executive order that carries forward 24 executive orders from her and previous administrations and eliminates dozens of others.

The governor decided not to renew nearly 70 executive orders, some of which date back 56 years. Many of the orders not being renewed deal with outdated policies and agencies or are inconsistent with federal law.

Thirteen of the 24 executive orders renewed were issued by Fallin. They include:

  • Prohibiting the use of tobacco products on all properties owned, leased or contracted for use by the state of Oklahoma.
  • Prohibiting the use of electronic cigarette or vaping devices on all properties owned, leased or contracted for use by the state of Oklahoma, excluding residents at state veterans homes.
  • Requiring state agencies to submit an electronic copy of proposed permanent rules to the governor and the appropriate Cabinet secretary.
  • Designating Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb as Oklahoma's small business advocate.