Mary Fallin

Gov. Mary Fallin delivers the 2014 State of the State address as Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb and House Speaker T.W. Shannon (R-Lawton) look on - February 3, 2014.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin will unveil her executive budget proposal Monday afternoon as she delivers her annual State of the State address to members of the GOP-controlled House and Senate.

With sliding oil prices expected to deepen an already-projected $300 million hole in next year's budget, Fallin told the Oklahoma Public Media Exchange's Michael Cross lawmakers will have to be creative as they attempt to balance a growing list of demands for state resources with a dwindling amount of available revenue.

President Obama delivers his annual State of the Union address Tuesday night before a joint session of Congress.
The White House / Twitter

Most of Oklahoma’s Congressional delegation and executive leadership criticized President Obama’s annual State of the Union address Tuesday night – some even before the speech took place.

Gov. Mary Fallin says Obama can achieve his goal of improving the economic conditions of the middle class by relying on the energy sector to grow the economy and raise per-capita income.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin has issued an executive order creating a special committee to develop reforms to how the state handles nonviolent offenders who have substance abuse problems and mental health issues.

Fallin issued the order Wednesday creating the six-member Oklahoma Justice Reform Steering Committee.

The committee will develop a plan for implementing justice reform measures tailored to Oklahoma's security needs and budget and prioritize ways to reduce prison overcrowding and promote public safety.

Facebook/Gov. Mary Fallin

Gov. Mary Fallin is promising to make health, education and criminal justice reform her priorities as she begins a second and final four-year term as Oklahoma's chief executive.

The 60-year-old governor headlined a chilly swearing-in ceremony Monday on the front steps of the state Capitol with her fellow Republican officeholders. Temperatures were in the low 30s, but gusty winds dropped the wind chill into the teens.

In remarks released ahead of the ceremony, Fallin touted her accomplishments during her first four years in office and charted a course for her second term.

Gov. Mary Fallin rehearses her second inaugural address January 11 on the south steps of the Oklahoma Capitol.
Gov. Mary Fallin / Facebook

Gov. Mary Fallin and other statewide elected officials are scheduled to take their oaths of office on a cloudy, blustery and cold day in Oklahoma City.

The ceremony is to start at noon Monday on the south steps of the state Capitol.

The National Weather Service forecast calls for fog and drizzle until midmorning, then clouds and temperatures in the low 30s and winds of 16-21 miles per hour with gusts of nearly 30 mph.

Fallin — a Republican — was re-elected to her second and final term in November.

The Oklahoma Senate
Becky McCray / Flickr Creative Commons

Support is growing among Republican leaders to have every other legislative session dedicated exclusively to writing the budget.

With as many as 3,000 bills filed every year, rank-and-file legislators complain they have little time to dedicate to working out Oklahoma's annual spending plan.

A proposal last year to send the issue to voters passed the House with bipartisan support, but was derailed in the Senate.

But Republican Gov. Mary Fallin endorsed the plan during her campaign for governor, and Senate President Pro Tem Brian Bingman said this week he's open to the idea.

Governor Mary Fallin at her swearing in ceremony in January 2011. / Google Creative Commons

Gov. Mary Fallin will celebrate the start of another four years in office with a series of inaugural events, beginning this week in Tulsa and Oklahoma City.

Fallin is expected to raise and spend more than $1 million on events that will culminate with a $150-per-person inaugural ball at the Cox Convention Center on Jan. 12.

She will be sworn into office on the same day during a public ceremony at the state Capitol.

Gov. Mary Fallin and other state leaders observe a PowerPoint presentation of revenue projections.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The State Board of Equalization met Thursday to certify state revenues for Gov. Mary Fallin's budgeting ahead of the next legislative session and fiscal year. Oklahoma has enough revenue to trigger an income tax cut.

The amount of money available to fund state government is trending flat, but officials say lackluster revenues seem manageable.

Gov. Mary Fallin delivers the 2014 State of the State address as Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb and House Speaker T.W. Shannon (R-Lawton) look on - February 3, 2014.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The state's highest court says Oklahoma governors have a privilege to protect confidential advice from top officials while deliberating policy and making executive decisions.

The Oklahoma Supreme Court said in a ruling released Tuesday the governor has a unique executive privilege that can't be encroached by the Legislature.

The decision was handed down Tuesday in a case filed by the American Civil Liberties Union of Oklahoma on behalf of the owners of a satirical website that pokes fun at Gov. Mary Fallin and other public officials.

Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation

Gov. Mary Fallin is appointing the first-ever woman to serve on the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission.

Fallin announced Tuesday she is naming Leigh Gaddis of Ada to replace the late Harland Stonecipher on the eight-member panel. Gaddis' appointment is pending confirmation from the Oklahoma Senate.

The owner of a financial planning and investment firm, Gaddis helped Fallin host a deer hunt in 2011 and is a regular participant in shooting sports.

Fallin is Oklahoma's first female governor and previously was the state's first female lieutenant governor.


Governor Mary Fallin's office has agreed to pay $125,000 to settle a lawsuit filed by the former director of Fallin's Tulsa office.

The Tulsa World reported the dismissal of the wrongful termination lawsuit on Sunday. Wendy Gregory filed the suit claiming she was fired because the governor's office feared bad publicity after the Internal Revenue Service sought to garnish her salary due to a child support dispute involving her husband and his previous wife.

Gregory has said the IRS soon withdrew the action.

la vaca vegetariana / Flickr Creative Commons

Since the federal Clean Water Act first became law in 1972, there’s been confusion over which bodies of water qualify for protection under its provisions. Enter the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Waters of the U.S. rule, which means to bring clarity to the situation.

Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

A closer-than-expected governor’s race, a neck-and-neck standoff for the state superintendent seat and several competitive state Senate seats comprise Tuesday’s general election.

Early voting began Thursday and continued through Saturday. Winners will take their seats at the start of the legislative session early next year.

Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

With midterm elections just around the corner, candidates are doing everything they can to earn the votes of any last-minute undecided Oklahomans.

Campaigning for governor looks a lot different when you already are governor. Incumbent Mary Fallin is trying to balance her job monitoring the capitol, where it’s legislative study season, with her campaigning schedule. She says it’s brutal. She averages five cities a day in a big, Republican red RV emblazoned with the outline of the state and the declaration “Mary on the Move.”

Stop and Talk

Gubernatorial Race Closer Than Expected

Oct 26, 2014

This year’s gubernatorial race between Gov. Mary Fallin and Democratic challenger Joe Dorman is closer than expected. One poll shows Dorman has narrowed the gap among likely voters, although Fallin retains a double-digit lead. Analysts say Fallin is running on the economy, while Dorman is stressing education in his campaign.

Democrat Joe Dorman says he knew facing an incumbent Republican in a solidly red state meant he would have to find and exploit a weakness if he hoped to defeat Republican Gov. Mary Fallin.

Fallin has never lost an election during her political career and has a roughly 5-to-1 fundraising edge over Dorman.

Dorman believes he's found Fallin's weakness in education policy. He hopes to tap into voter frustration as a result of policies pushed by Fallin and the Republican-controlled Legislature. These include an A-F grading system for schools, high-stakes reading tests for third graders, and the repeal of Common Core standards.

Meanwhile, Fallin says education will be a priority of her second term and stresses Oklahoma's economy that includes decreasing unemployment and increases in personal income and state revenue.

American currency
thinkpanama / Flickr Creative Commons

A report released by the Office of Management and Enterprise Services says 30 state agency directors received raises of at least $10,000 last fiscal year, with some receiving more than double that amount.

Joe Dorman and Mary Fallin
Wikimedia Commons

Gubernatorial candidate Joe Dorman is no longer cash-poor.

Dorman, a Democratic state representative from Rush Springs, is challenging Gov. Mary Fallin, the Republican incumbent.

Political experts have said Dorman can't beat Fallin partly because he wouldn't be able to  raise enough money to compete. And indeed, at the end of August, Fallin’s campaign war chest had more than $1.3 million compared with Dorman's $142,000.

But the money picture has changed.

Gov. Mary Fallin and Secretary of Energy and Environment Michael Teague at the Governor's Energy Conference September 4, 2014 in Oklahoma CIty.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma’s earthquake surge and possible links to oil and gas activity have been studied in scientific papers, discussed at heated town-hall meetings and explored regulatory hearings.

The quakes are now triggering some rumblings at the state Capitol.

About 4,000 earthquakes have shaken Oklahoma this year, data from the Oklahoma Geological Survey show. Most of the quakes have been small — roughly 10 percent were 3.0-magnitude or greater, the threshold at which seismologists say the temblors are likely perceivable.

Oklahoma Health Officials Say Ebola Plans In Place

Oct 13, 2014
Gov. Mary Fallin meets with state and local health officials to discuss ongoing preparations for potential Ebola threat .
Alex Weintz / Twitter

Oklahoma health officials say there are no cases of Ebola virus infections in the state — but that emergency response plans are in place in case a person is diagnosed with the disease.

State health and public safety officials joined Gov. Mary Fallin Monday to discuss how the state will respond should someone in the state be diagnosed with Ebola. A health care worker at a hospital in Dallas where an Ebola victim was treated before his death was diagnosed with the disease during the weekend. Late last week a patient who was being monitored with Ebola-like symptoms at Deaconess Hospital in Oklahoma City was confirmed not to have the virus.

Analysis Of The Gubernatorial Debate By eCapitol

Oct 6, 2014

Talking to OETA Managing Editor, Dick Pryor, e-Capitol News Director reviews the gubernatorial debate and previews some of the more interesting state senate races in this year’s general election.