Mary Fallin


Governor Mary Fallin's office has agreed to pay $125,000 to settle a lawsuit filed by the former director of Fallin's Tulsa office.

The Tulsa World reported the dismissal of the wrongful termination lawsuit on Sunday. Wendy Gregory filed the suit claiming she was fired because the governor's office feared bad publicity after the Internal Revenue Service sought to garnish her salary due to a child support dispute involving her husband and his previous wife.

Gregory has said the IRS soon withdrew the action.

la vaca vegetariana / Flickr Creative Commons

Since the federal Clean Water Act first became law in 1972, there’s been confusion over which bodies of water qualify for protection under its provisions. Enter the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Waters of the U.S. rule, which means to bring clarity to the situation.

Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

A closer-than-expected governor’s race, a neck-and-neck standoff for the state superintendent seat and several competitive state Senate seats comprise Tuesday’s general election.

Early voting began Thursday and continued through Saturday. Winners will take their seats at the start of the legislative session early next year.

Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

With midterm elections just around the corner, candidates are doing everything they can to earn the votes of any last-minute undecided Oklahomans.

Campaigning for governor looks a lot different when you already are governor. Incumbent Mary Fallin is trying to balance her job monitoring the capitol, where it’s legislative study season, with her campaigning schedule. She says it’s brutal. She averages five cities a day in a big, Republican red RV emblazoned with the outline of the state and the declaration “Mary on the Move.”

Stop and Talk

Gubernatorial Race Closer Than Expected

Oct 26, 2014

This year’s gubernatorial race between Gov. Mary Fallin and Democratic challenger Joe Dorman is closer than expected. One poll shows Dorman has narrowed the gap among likely voters, although Fallin retains a double-digit lead. Analysts say Fallin is running on the economy, while Dorman is stressing education in his campaign.

Democrat Joe Dorman says he knew facing an incumbent Republican in a solidly red state meant he would have to find and exploit a weakness if he hoped to defeat Republican Gov. Mary Fallin.

Fallin has never lost an election during her political career and has a roughly 5-to-1 fundraising edge over Dorman.

Dorman believes he's found Fallin's weakness in education policy. He hopes to tap into voter frustration as a result of policies pushed by Fallin and the Republican-controlled Legislature. These include an A-F grading system for schools, high-stakes reading tests for third graders, and the repeal of Common Core standards.

Meanwhile, Fallin says education will be a priority of her second term and stresses Oklahoma's economy that includes decreasing unemployment and increases in personal income and state revenue.

American currency
thinkpanama / Flickr Creative Commons

A report released by the Office of Management and Enterprise Services says 30 state agency directors received raises of at least $10,000 last fiscal year, with some receiving more than double that amount.

Joe Dorman and Mary Fallin
Wikimedia Commons

Gubernatorial candidate Joe Dorman is no longer cash-poor.

Dorman, a Democratic state representative from Rush Springs, is challenging Gov. Mary Fallin, the Republican incumbent.

Political experts have said Dorman can't beat Fallin partly because he wouldn't be able to  raise enough money to compete. And indeed, at the end of August, Fallin’s campaign war chest had more than $1.3 million compared with Dorman's $142,000.

But the money picture has changed.

Gov. Mary Fallin and Secretary of Energy and Environment Michael Teague at the Governor's Energy Conference September 4, 2014 in Oklahoma CIty.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma’s earthquake surge and possible links to oil and gas activity have been studied in scientific papers, discussed at heated town-hall meetings and explored regulatory hearings.

The quakes are now triggering some rumblings at the state Capitol.

About 4,000 earthquakes have shaken Oklahoma this year, data from the Oklahoma Geological Survey show. Most of the quakes have been small — roughly 10 percent were 3.0-magnitude or greater, the threshold at which seismologists say the temblors are likely perceivable.

Oklahoma Health Officials Say Ebola Plans In Place

Oct 13, 2014
Gov. Mary Fallin meets with state and local health officials to discuss ongoing preparations for potential Ebola threat .
Alex Weintz / Twitter

Oklahoma health officials say there are no cases of Ebola virus infections in the state — but that emergency response plans are in place in case a person is diagnosed with the disease.

State health and public safety officials joined Gov. Mary Fallin Monday to discuss how the state will respond should someone in the state be diagnosed with Ebola. A health care worker at a hospital in Dallas where an Ebola victim was treated before his death was diagnosed with the disease during the weekend. Late last week a patient who was being monitored with Ebola-like symptoms at Deaconess Hospital in Oklahoma City was confirmed not to have the virus.

Analysis Of The Gubernatorial Debate By eCapitol

Oct 6, 2014

Talking to OETA Managing Editor, Dick Pryor, e-Capitol News Director reviews the gubernatorial debate and previews some of the more interesting state senate races in this year’s general election.