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medical marijuana

Oklahoma will now exclude cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating chemical found in marijuana, from its definition of the drug.
Dank Depot / Flickr Creative Commons

The state of Oklahoma has changed its definition of marijuana to exclude federally approved treatments containing cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating chemical found in the plant.  

Attorney Chad Moody specializes in criminal defense cases involving drug charges.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Even though it'll likely be two years before Oklahoma voters can decide whether or not to legalize medical marijuana, supporters are already thinking about how to win.

Proponents will start trying to raise at least $500,000 after the presidential election. Chip Paul, the Tulsa-based chairman of Oklahomans for Health, said it could take three times that to make sure enough supporters get to the polls in support of the measure.

Ryan Kiesel is executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Oklahoma.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Even though it won't be this fall, Oklahoma voters will decide whether or not to approve medical marijuana issue in a future election.

When the campaign for medical marijuana turned in its petition, they had more signatures than they needed, but only about 1,800 more.

So if someone challenged the signature count, it wouldn’t take much to invalidate the months of work. But Thursday was the last day to object and no one did.

Willy Jones, one of the area organizers for Oklahomans for Health, holds a sign in support of medical marijuana during a petition drive outside a vapor shop in Oklahoma City, Thursday, July 3, 2014.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

It looks much less likely a proposed constitutional amendment to legalize medical marijuana in Oklahoma will appear on the ballot this fall.

Oklahoma state capitol
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Gov. Mary Fallin signed election proclamations Monday for five state questions that will now be on November’s general election ballot.

Supporters of medical marijuana gather petition signatures in front of the Oklahoma state capitol on Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Supporters of an initiative petition that would legalize medical marijuana in Oklahoma delivered boxes of signatures to the Secretary of State’s office Thursday, but they aren’t sure if they have enough signatures to put the measure on November’s ballot.

The group Oklahomans for Health needs nearly 66,000 signatures. Chip Paul is a medical researcher and co-chair of the organization. He says at last count - about a week and a half ago – volunteers had 50,000 and continued to gather signatures right up to the deadline.

Jimmy Hendershot, owner of 23rd Street Vapes in Oklahoma City, said he would consider converting his business to serve medical marijuana clients if the petition gets on the ballot and is approved.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The group Oklahomans for Health still needs several thousand signatures for its medical marijuana initiative petition by Thursday afternoon's deadline.

While the group has been collecting signatures, others have been thinking about how pot could be big business here, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

A volunteer with Oklahomans for Health hands a passerby a petition to sign at the group’s tent at Northwest Expressway and Meridian Avenue in Oklahoma City. The group is collecting signature for a ballot initiative that would legalize marijuana.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The group collecting signatures for a medical marijuana ballot question is roughly two-thirds of the way to its goal of 80,000 signatures by August 11.

Oklahomans for Health, led by former state Rep. and 2014 Democratic gubernatorial nominee Joe Dorman, is now offering its volunteers cash to collect valid names:

The group is now advertising an incentive for its circulators – $1 for every person who signs both petitions, as long as it’s a registered Oklahoma voter and as long as the measure reaches the ballot.

medical marijuana
David Trawin / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Oklahoma's most recent Democratic gubernatorial nominee is spearheading an effort to let state residents vote on the use of medical marijuana.

2014 nominee and former state Rep. Joe Dorman is a board member of Oklahomans for Health. On Monday the group filed an initiative petition to begin gathering signatures to place the proposal on the ballot in November. The group will have 90 days to gather about 86,000 signatures from registered voters to get the proposal on the ballot.

Oklahoma will now exclude cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating chemical found in marijuana, from its definition of the drug.
Dank Depot / Flickr Creative Commons

A group seeking to legalize the use of medical marijuana in Oklahoma has taken the first step toward putting the issue to a vote of the people in 2016.

Isaac Caviness with the group Green the Vote filed paperwork Friday with the Oklahoma Secretary of State's Office indicating their plans to have the question placed on the ballot.

Once the proposed language is approved, the group will have 90 days to gather about 124,000 signatures in order to qualify the state question.

Oklahoma will now exclude cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating chemical found in marijuana, from its definition of the drug.
Dank Depot / Flickr Creative Commons

The Oklahoma Secretary of State's Office says an effort to legalize medical marijuana in the state has fallen short of the number of signatures needed to put the issue on a ballot.

Officials said Thursday volunteers for Tulsa-based Oklahomans for Health collected 75,384 signatures in their initiative petition drive. But they needed 155,216 to get the issue on the Nov. 4 general election ballot.

Oklahoma will now exclude cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating chemical found in marijuana, from its definition of the drug.
Dank Depot / Flickr Creative Commons

A group that supports the use of medical marijuana in Oklahoma plans to submit signed petitions to the Oklahoma Secretary of State's office to have the issue placed on the November ballot.

Tulsa-based Oklahomans for Health plans to submit the petitions on Friday. The group faces a Saturday deadline to gather the signatures of more than 155,000 registered Oklahoma voters who support a referendum on the issue.

Wikimedia Commons

Gov. Mary Fallin says she supports the legalization of an oil derived from cannabis, but says she remains firmly opposed to legalizing all medical marijuana.

Fallin asked lawmakers Wednesday to support the legalization of cannabidiol, which is an oil derived from the marijuana plant. The oil can only be taken orally and is non-psychoactive. Research suggests it may be effective to treat toddlers with rare conditions that cause seizures and strokes.

In September 2006, Weaver was appointed Director of the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control where he is currently serving his 26th year as a Commissioned law enforcement Agent.
Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control

As the petition to put the legalization of marijuana on the ballots for a vote are still circulating, the Oklahoma State Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control is standing its ground in opposition of the question but preparing for its possible passage.

Executive Director Darrell Weaver said during Tuesday’s board meeting that “we’re all aware that this petition is out there” and that “probably this and prescription drugs, is the number one thing that most states are addressing.”

JTobiason Photography / Flickr.com

Efforts are underway to place initiatives involving storm shelters and marijuana sales on this November's ballot.

Whether this year's measures would help one candidate or party is unclear. A cockfighting initiative on the 2002 ballot drew large numbers of rural Democrats to the polls, and that was the year an underdog Democratic state senator from Shawnee named Brad Henry won the governor's race.

Henry won with 43.3% of the vote, compared to Republican Steve Largent with 41.6% and conservative independent Gary Richardson with 14.1%. 

Ballot initiatives must be submitted 60 days for inclusion on the ballot, so both petitions must be submitted by September 5th. Oklahoma ballot initiatives have 90 days to gather all signatures, and at the latest must be submitted 60 days before an election -- in this case, September 5th. The medical marijuana initiative began June 3rd. The recreational marijuana initiative began June 16th. The storm shelter initiative began July 2nd.

futureatlas.com / Flickr.com

A group seeking a statewide vote on whether to allow medicinal marijuana in Oklahoma is formally launching its signature drive with a rally at the state Capitol.

The Tulsa-based group Oklahomans for Health kicked off its petition drive Wednesday, with a group of about 50 supporters.

They must gather signatures from more than 155,000 registered Oklahoma voters in order to have the issue placed on the November ballot.

Oklahoma will now exclude cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating chemical found in marijuana, from its definition of the drug.
Dank Depot / Flickr Creative Commons

An initiative petition that would permit the sale and cultivation of medical marijuana has been filed with the Oklahoma secretary of state's office.

A Tulsa-based group known as Oklahomans for Health filed the petition Friday for a statewide vote. Supporters will have 90 days from the petition's filing or after the petition is deemed sufficient by the state Supreme Court, whichever is later, to collect 155,216 voter signatures needed to get it on the ballot.