mental health

Oklahoma Watch
8:32 pm
Wed December 3, 2014

Report: State Beset With Mental Illness, Lack of Treatment

Credit Kaiser Health News / Wikipedia Commons

Oklahoma is among five states that struggle the most with high rates of mental illness and a lack of access to treatment, according to a national report released Wednesday

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Politics and Government
5:00 am
Tue September 30, 2014

New Push To Allow Juvenile Competency Hearings

Credit Kaiser Health News / Wikipedia Commons

The Tulsa County boy’s relationship with family was one of instability, impoverishment and abuse.

Psychologists would later determine that he was mentally ill and very immature, even for 12 years of age. But his alleged crime was serious – felony assault with a dangerous weapon on a family member who had abused him.

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Oklahoma Watch
9:31 am
Sun September 21, 2014

In Pursuit Of Breakthroughs In State’s Mental Health Struggles

Credit Kaiser Health News / Wikipedia Commons

Four out of five people who kill themselves in Oklahoma are men.

Law enforcement officers are only beginning to learn how to deal properly with the mentally ill.

Society as a whole, including the medical field, often fails to see the relationship between mental and physical health, leading to tragic outcomes.

Those were among the key messages imparted at a mental health gathering in Tulsa on Thursday and Friday attended by nearly 700 people, including advocates, funders and professionals in mental health and law enforcement.

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Oklahoma Forum
12:25 pm
Mon August 25, 2014

Oklahoma Forum: Mental Health

Following the death of comedian and actor Robin Williams, Oklahoma Forum host Dick Pryor leads a discussion of mental illness, depression, and suicide with:

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Oklahoma Watch
7:00 am
Sun August 24, 2014

A Mental Health Mission Goes Statewide

Michael Brose, Executive Director of the Mental Health Association of Oklahoma.
Credit Angela Chambers / Oklahoma Watch

Growing up in Kansas near the Oklahoma Panhandle, Michael Brose saw firsthand the struggles of rural residents to find quality health care.

Later, in two decades as executive director of the Mental Health Association in Tulsa, Brose observed similar problems with urban residents’ access to affordable care for mental illness and substance abuse.

Today, Brose is using his experience in those two settings to carry out a new, broader mission for his advocacy organization. In April, the Mental Health Association in Tulsa renamed itself the Mental Health Association Oklahoma. That change occurred after the Mental Health Association of Central Oklahoma in Oklahoma City closed its doors.

MHA Oklahoma, based in Tulsa, is now the state’s most prominent nonprofit to focus on mental health services beyond the local level. The need is great: Oklahoma’s rate of mental illness ranks among the highest in the nation, and funding for health services is limited.

In an interview with Oklahoma Watch, Brose discussed the association’s plans for expansion; efforts to help the homeless, teens and veterans, and how to prevent suicide. The interview has been edited and condensed.

You now lead an organization for the entire state. Does that mean you will be offering your services for the mentally ill in every part of Oklahoma?

It’s a step-by-step approach. We’ve always served the Tulsa metro area. The next step is to develop systems that will primarily be targeting Oklahoma City and central Oklahoma areas that will include Norman. I spoke and met with people in Stillwater not too long ago. Ultimately, we want to serve the whole state. Before the expansion, we consulted and worked with contacts in central Oklahoma and around the state in rural areas. We’ve become a member of the United Way of Central Oklahoma, so we’re members of both United Ways (Tulsa and Central Oklahoma).

One of the most exciting things about expanding in other parts of the state is meeting people. We’re all Oklahomans and have similar needs. We’ve had this long history of this dichotomy between Oklahoma City and Tulsa, and we’re really about doing our part to break down those barriers.

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Mental Health
2:04 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

Bad News Blues

An Indian man reads a newspaper with the news featuring the crash of a Malaysia Airlines plane carrying 298 people from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur at a newspaper stand in Siliguri on July 18,2014. (Diptendu Dutta/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue August 5, 2014 12:44 pm

The onslaught of bad news seems relentless. Here are just a few of the stories we have been following this summer: the wars in Gaza and Syria, the fighting in Iraq, a Malaysia Airlines jet shot down over Ukraine, another missing since March, the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, and here in the U.S., the crisis on the border and floods and fires in the West.

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The Two-Way
10:39 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Hospitals Say They Had Room To Help Before Virginia Tragedy

The Millboro, Va., home of state Sen. Creigh Deeds. He was attacked there Tuesday — authorities believe by his son Gus. The younger Deeds then may have fatally shot himself, investigators say.
Don Petersen AP

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 7:00 pm

Update at 8 p.m. ET. State IG Opens Investigation

The Washington Post reports that the state's Office of Inspector General has opened an investigation into why the son of Virginia state Sen. R. Creigh Deeds was released from custody the day before the stabbing.

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Oklahoma Watch
1:35 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

With Hundreds Of Suicides Each Year, New Offensives Are Under Way To Reduce The Toll

Brandon Magalassi
Credit Provided

The aftermath of a suicide is an endless tunnel – of pain, regrets and questions.

Could something have been done to stop him? Why did she do it? What warning signs were there?

The act of taking one’s life leaves no easy answers for those left behind.

“The majority of people who are survivors spend the rest of their lives not talking about this and suffering in silence,” said Mike Brose, executive director of the Mental Health Association in Tulsa, which will soon rename itself as as statewide group. “You don’t necessarily get over it, but you can get better.”

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Tornado Recovery
2:42 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Resources for Helping Youth and Children Cope with Disaster

Resources for parents, teachers, mental health professionals, and first responders, compiled by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network:

After the Tornado: Helping Young Children Heal (PDF)

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