KGOU

Mexico

In this July 2, 2017 photo, Veracruz state police patrol along the waterfront boulevard in Coatzacoalcos, Mexico.
Rebecca Blackwell / AP

The recent surge of violence in Mexico is due to greater competition for territory between drug cartels, according to a University of Oklahoma political scientist.

Charles Kenney told KGOU’s World Views the Mexican government’s war on drug cartels weakened some drug cartels, but others have stepped up to fill the void,  creating violence.

Former Mexican Ambassador to the U.S., Arturo Sarukhan Casamitjana, pauses before answering question during his interview with the Associated Press in Washington, Monday, Jan. 26, 2009.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

The United States and Mexico have a daily economic impact on each other, but citizens of both countries often don’t grasp the importance of the U.S.-Mexico relationship and how necessary cooperation is, according to a former Mexican ambassador.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the international reaction to Tuesday’s election of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States.

Then Rebecca talks with Mexican author Nadia Villafuerte’s Her work focuses on the difficulties Central American migrants face coming across Mexico’s southern border. They'll also discuss women's and gender issues and access to education.

Nadia Villafuerte
Oscar Garcia

Born in Chiapas, Mexico, author Nadia Villafuerte has traveled across continents to share her research and vision with a wide range of audiences.

In her three solo-authored books, Barcos en Houston, ¿Te gusta el latex, cielo? and Por el lado salvaje, Villafuerte has used her personal and academic knowledge of Mexico’s lesser-discussed southern border to frame her stories.

Mexico has been deporting record numbers of Central American children in recent months, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center.

Mexico deported more than 3,800 unaccompanied minors from October 2014 to February 2015, a 56 percent increase over the same period the previous year. That has contributed to the significant drop in the number of unaccompanied children crossing into the U.S. since last fall.

My colleagues and I drove 2,428 miles and remained in the same place.

We gathered a team, rented a car, checked the batteries in our recorders and cameras. We moved from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean. We crossed deserts, plains and mountains. But all the while, we were living in Borderland — zigzagging across the frontier between Mexico and the United States.

World Views: February 14, 2014

Feb 14, 2014

Suzette Grillot hosts the program from Puebla, Mexico, and shares her thoughts on the colonial city with University of Oklahoma Spanish literature historian Luis Cortest.

Later, a conversation with Pakistan analysts and scholars Joshua White and Shamyla Chaudry about how the country's burgeoning, educated youth population and how various religious and militant groups pose distinct policy concerns for the South Asian nuclear power and the United States.

Suzette Grillot / KGOU

Mexican authorities’ ongoing struggle with drug cartels continues. University of Oklahoma Spanish literature historian Luis Cortest says ongoing drug traffic-related violence would continue to be a problem until government policy changes.

“It is possible for places to change, for countries to change, for cities to change,” Cortest says. “The best example in Latin America is Colombia.” 

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss China 's move to grab airspace over the East China Sea, and ongoing protests in Ukraine over a jailed political leader, and a scuttled trade pact with the European Union.

The Dallas Morning News Mexico Bureau Chief Alfredo Corchado joins Grillot to talk about his 20-year career. His memoir Midnight in Mexico chronicles his coverage of the country’s war against the drug cartels.

Reporter and author Alfredo Corchado covers a political rally in the border city of Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, in 1986.
Billy Calzada

Alfredo Corchado has spent nearly 20 years covering his native country as the Mexico bureau chief for The Dallas Morning News.

From first reporting on government protests in Ciudad Juárez in the mid-80s, through five presidential administrations and a violent drug war with no end in sight, he says he’s always left with the fact that it’s not enough.

Over the last decade, the foreign-born population in Mexico has nearly doubled, and the country is turning into an immigrant destination. Suzette Grillot talks with University of Oklahoma Latin America scholar Alan McPherson about the new dynamics of migration in our southern neighbor.

Later, a conversation with environmental journalist Emma Marris. She writes about “assisted migration” - deliberately helping plants and animals colonize new habitats.

Sam Beebe / Flickr Creative Commons

Over the last decade, the foreign-born population in Mexico has nearly doubled, and the country is turning into an immigrant destination – especially for American citizens.

The New York Times reported Sunday that International Monetary Fund data shows Mexico’s economy outpaced the United States, Canada and Brazil in 2011 and 2012.

University of Oklahoma International and Area Studies Professor Alan McPherson is an expert on U.S.-Latin America relations. He says Mexico’s economy is more diverse than it’s ever been, but there’s a downside to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and other aspects of globalization.

Loren / Wikimedia Commons

Last week U.S. embassies and consulates across the Middle East and North Africa closed in response to an intercepted message among senior al-Qaeda operatives.

This threat highlights the important, and precarious, position of U.S. diplomatic missions overseas.

Veteran diplomat Michael Yoder has spent more than 20 years as a U.S. Foreign Service Officer. During this time, he has served in eight countries including Mexico, Poland, India, and Uzbekistan.