Mexico

Parallels
6:35 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Borderland: A Journey Along The Changing Frontier

Dob Cunningham (right) and his friend Larry Johnson stand on the edge of Cunningham's 800-acre ranch in Quemado, Texas, which touches the Rio Grande. On the other side, Mexico.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 4:42 pm

My colleagues and I drove 2,428 miles and remained in the same place.

We gathered a team, rented a car, checked the batteries in our recorders and cameras. We moved from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean. We crossed deserts, plains and mountains. But all the while, we were living in Borderland — zigzagging across the frontier between Mexico and the United States.

Read more
World Views
4:30 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

World Views: February 14, 2014

Listen to the entire February 14, 2013 episode.

Suzette Grillot hosts the program from Puebla, Mexico, and shares her thoughts on the colonial city with University of Oklahoma Spanish literature historian Luis Cortest.

Later, a conversation with Pakistan analysts and scholars Joshua White and Shamyla Chaudry about how the country's burgeoning, educated youth population and how various religious and militant groups pose distinct policy concerns for the South Asian nuclear power and the United States.

Read more
World Views
3:57 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

SLIDESHOW: On The Road - Investment In Economy And Education Provides Positive Outlook For Mexico

The 17th Century Church of San Cristobal in Puebla, Mexico
Suzette Grillot KGOU

Mexican authorities’ ongoing struggle with drug cartels continues. University of Oklahoma Spanish literature historian Luis Cortest says ongoing drug traffic-related violence would continue to be a problem until government policy changes.

“It is possible for places to change, for countries to change, for cities to change,” Cortest says. “The best example in Latin America is Colombia.” 

Read more
World Views
4:30 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

World Views: December 6, 2013

Listen to the entire December 6, 2013 episode.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss China 's move to grab airspace over the East China Sea, and ongoing protests in Ukraine over a jailed political leader, and a scuttled trade pact with the European Union.

The Dallas Morning News Mexico Bureau Chief Alfredo Corchado joins Grillot to talk about his 20-year career. His memoir Midnight in Mexico chronicles his coverage of the country’s war against the drug cartels.

Read more
World Views
7:34 am
Wed December 4, 2013

Reporting Mexico’s Drug War From Oaxaca To Oklahoma

Reporter and author Alfredo Corchado covers a political rally in the border city of Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, in 1986.
Credit Billy Calzada

Alfredo Corchado has spent nearly 20 years covering his native country as the Mexico bureau chief for The Dallas Morning News.

From first reporting on government protests in Ciudad Juárez in the mid-80s, through five presidential administrations and a violent drug war with no end in sight, he says he’s always left with the fact that it’s not enough.

Read more
World Views
4:30 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

World Views: September 27, 2013

Listen to the entire September 27, 2013 episode.

Over the last decade, the foreign-born population in Mexico has nearly doubled, and the country is turning into an immigrant destination. Suzette Grillot talks with University of Oklahoma Latin America scholar Alan McPherson about the new dynamics of migration in our southern neighbor.

Later, a conversation with environmental journalist Emma Marris. She writes about “assisted migration” - deliberately helping plants and animals colonize new habitats.

Read more
World Views
12:05 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

How Mexico Is Becoming An Economic Powerhouse And Immigrant Destination

Mexico City, Mexico.
Credit Sam Beebe / Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Alan McPherson, the ConocoPhillips Petroleum Chair of Latin American Studies at the University of Oklahoma.

Over the last decade, the foreign-born population in Mexico has nearly doubled, and the country is turning into an immigrant destination – especially for American citizens.

The New York Times reported Sunday that International Monetary Fund data shows Mexico’s economy outpaced the United States, Canada and Brazil in 2011 and 2012.

University of Oklahoma International and Area Studies Professor Alan McPherson is an expert on U.S.-Latin America relations. He says Mexico’s economy is more diverse than it’s ever been, but there’s a downside to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and other aspects of globalization.

Read more
World Views
6:57 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Diplomat Yoder On The Challenges And Rewards Of Working In The U.S. Foreign Service

The Harry S. Truman Building in Washington D.C. Headquarters of the U.S. Department of State
Credit Loren / Wikimedia Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's interview with Michael Yoder.

Last week U.S. embassies and consulates across the Middle East and North Africa closed in response to an intercepted message among senior al-Qaeda operatives.

This threat highlights the important, and precarious, position of U.S. diplomatic missions overseas.

Veteran diplomat Michael Yoder has spent more than 20 years as a U.S. Foreign Service Officer. During this time, he has served in eight countries including Mexico, Poland, India, and Uzbekistan.

Read more