NASA

Science, Technology and Environment
1:47 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

25 Years Later, What's Next For Hubble?

The sparkling centerpiece of Hubble’s silver anniversary fireworks is a giant cluster of about 3,000 stars called Westerlund 2. Credits: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), A. Nota (ESA/STScI), and the Westerlund 2 Science Team

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 1:41 pm

It was 25 years ago that Hubble Space Telescope launched into space. The 44-foot orbiting telescope has made 1.2 million observations of celestial bodies far into the reaches of the universe. It has helped change the understanding of space, and it’s made nebulae and black holes the thing of elementary school classrooms.

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Space
2:41 pm
Fri March 6, 2015

A New Dawn: NASA Spacecraft Reaches Ceres

Ceres is seen from NASA's Dawn spacecraft on March 1, just a few days before the mission achieved orbit around the previously unexplored dwarf planet. The image was taken at a distance of about 30,000 miles (about 48,000 kilometers). (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

Originally published on Fri March 6, 2015 2:00 pm

After eight years and 3 billion miles, NASA’s “Dawn” spacecraft finally slipped into orbit around Ceres, a dwarf planet between Mars and Jupiter. The big moment happened at 7:39 a.m. Eastern time and it’s a historic mission on many levels.

Dawn is the world’s first attempt at a double encounter in space; the vessel first traveled to Vesta, one of the largest asteroids in the Solar System, and after 14 months, started its journey to Ceres.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
12:26 pm
Tue February 10, 2015

The Moon Like You Have Never Seen It Before

YouTube

Originally published on Tue February 10, 2015 8:58 am

There are many invisible realities that lie hidden from us. Some things happen too fast for us to see. Some things are too small to see. Some things are too far away. Some things, however, are right in front of us, but we are just in the wrong position to get a clear view.

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Science, Technology and Environment
4:09 pm
Wed February 4, 2015

NASA May Finally Look For Life On Jupiter Moon

Europa as seen by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. (NASA)

Originally published on Wed February 4, 2015 2:00 pm

On Monday, the White House presented Congress with a 2016 budget proposal that includes increased funding for NASA, and over $1.3 billion earmarked “for planetary science including formulation of a mission to Jupiter’s moon Europa.”

The exploration of Europa has long been a dream for planetary scientists and astrobiologists, of whom many believe that might be the best place to look for life beyond Earth because beneath its icy surface lay oceans warmed by undersea volcanoes.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
1:26 pm
Tue September 9, 2014

Can We Jump-Start A New Space Age?

An artist's view of BoldlyGo's SCIM mission in which a probe would skim the Martian atmosphere capturing dust particles and returning them to Earth.
BoldlyGo Institute, Inc.

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 1:42 pm

Jon Morse, former astrophysics division director at NASA, can remember the exact moment he knew things had to change.

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Science and Technology
1:58 pm
Thu August 14, 2014

NASA Chief On Past And Future Of U.S. Space Program

A Perseid meteor streaks through the Earth's atmosphere, as seen and photographed by astronaut Ron Garan while aboard the International Space Station on August 13, 2011. (NASA)

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 1:46 pm

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson for a wide-ranging conversation about the past and future of NASA’s effort to explore the universe.

Bolden discusses the future of the International Space Station and U.S. cooperation with Russia, and he weighs the chances that NASA will discover life in the Milky Way galaxy.

Bolden says that the U.S. will be able to send astronauts to space again by 2017, with the help of American private industry.

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

U.S. 'Space Fence' Will Cease To Operate, Site Says

A rendering of objects currently in Low Earth Orbit (not illustrated to scale). According to NASA, "approximately 95 percent of the objects in this illustration are orbital debris, i.e., not functional satellites."
NASA

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 3:54 pm

A U.S. radar system that tracks thousands of objects orbiting Earth — from satellites to harmful debris — has been slated for shutdown, according to the Space News site. The ground-based network known as the "Space Fence" may cease to operate in October.

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The Two-Way
11:44 am
Thu August 8, 2013

NASA: Sun Getting Ready For A 'Field Flip'

NASA/SDO

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 2:05 pm

Our nearest star is about to pull a once-in-11-years move by swapping its north and south magnetic poles.

The sun's polarity switch is a natural part of "solar max" — the period of peak activity during what averages out to be roughly an 11-year cycle. According to NASA, this year will mark the fourth time since 1976 that scientists have observed the 180-degree pole flip.

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The Two-Way
8:45 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Astronauts Go On Spacewalk To Fix Ammonia Leak

NASA.gov

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 4:11 pm

Two astronauts went on a last-minute spacewalk Saturday to replace a pump suspected of being the source of a serious ammonia leak.

It was unclear what caused the ammonia leak, NASA spokesman Rob Navias said, "but the installation of this spare pump package — at least at the moment — seems to have done the trick."

NASA officials called the spacewalk a success, but said it would take time to see if the leak was indeed stopped. Engineers will review photos the astronauts took at the site.

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