NASA

Oklahoma native Gen. Thomas Stafford (foreground) and Soviet cosmonaut Aleksei Leonov shake hands as they open the hatch between the Apollo command module and the Soyuz 19 spacecraft in July, 1975.
NASA

The two commanders of an historic 1975 space flight that helped improve U.S.-Soviet relations during the Cold War gathered in Oklahoma Monday to mark the 40th anniversary of the mission.

U.S. Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.) speaking on the House floor in support of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 - December 12, 2013.
CSPAN / YouTube

The University of Oklahoma has been awarded a grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

The grant was awarded through NASA's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research to help further the agency's mission.

The grant will fund three years of research involving energy production and life support in the long-range exploration of space.

25 Years Later, What's Next For Hubble?

Apr 24, 2015

It was 25 years ago that Hubble Space Telescope launched into space. The 44-foot orbiting telescope has made 1.2 million observations of celestial bodies far into the reaches of the universe. It has helped change the understanding of space, and it’s made nebulae and black holes the thing of elementary school classrooms.

A New Dawn: NASA Spacecraft Reaches Ceres

Mar 6, 2015

After eight years and 3 billion miles, NASA’s “Dawn” spacecraft finally slipped into orbit around Ceres, a dwarf planet between Mars and Jupiter. The big moment happened at 7:39 a.m. Eastern time and it’s a historic mission on many levels.

Dawn is the world’s first attempt at a double encounter in space; the vessel first traveled to Vesta, one of the largest asteroids in the Solar System, and after 14 months, started its journey to Ceres.

There are many invisible realities that lie hidden from us. Some things happen too fast for us to see. Some things are too small to see. Some things are too far away. Some things, however, are right in front of us, but we are just in the wrong position to get a clear view.

On Monday, the White House presented Congress with a 2016 budget proposal that includes increased funding for NASA, and over $1.3 billion earmarked “for planetary science including formulation of a mission to Jupiter’s moon Europa.”

The exploration of Europa has long been a dream for planetary scientists and astrobiologists, of whom many believe that might be the best place to look for life beyond Earth because beneath its icy surface lay oceans warmed by undersea volcanoes.

Jon Morse, former astrophysics division director at NASA, can remember the exact moment he knew things had to change.

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson for a wide-ranging conversation about the past and future of NASA’s effort to explore the universe.

Bolden discusses the future of the International Space Station and U.S. cooperation with Russia, and he weighs the chances that NASA will discover life in the Milky Way galaxy.

Bolden says that the U.S. will be able to send astronauts to space again by 2017, with the help of American private industry.

A U.S. radar system that tracks thousands of objects orbiting Earth — from satellites to harmful debris — has been slated for shutdown, according to the Space News site. The ground-based network known as the "Space Fence" may cease to operate in October.

Our nearest star is about to pull a once-in-11-years move by swapping its north and south magnetic poles.

The sun's polarity switch is a natural part of "solar max" — the period of peak activity during what averages out to be roughly an 11-year cycle. According to NASA, this year will mark the fourth time since 1976 that scientists have observed the 180-degree pole flip.

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