Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act

National Archives And Records Administration

Jim Thorpe. One of the greatest athletes of the 20th century – if not the greatest. After winning two gold medals at the 1912 Olympics, Sweden’s King Gustav V reportedly told him, “You, sir, are the greatest athlete in the world.”

Thorpe’s response? “Thanks.”

Doug Kerr / Flickr Creative Commons

The Pennsylvania town where famed athlete Jim Thorpe was laid to rest in 1953 has asked a federal appeals court to throw out a ruling that could clear the way for his remains to be moved to American Indian land in Oklahoma.

Lawyers for the town of Jim Thorpe say that a judge erred when he ruled the town amounts to a museum under the 1990 Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act.

The town's appeal was filed Monday in Philadelphia.

Doug Kerr / Flickr Creative Commons

A federal ruling is clearing the way for Jim Thorpe's two surviving sons to have his remains removed from the Pennsylvania town that bears his name and reinterred on Native American land in Oklahoma.

U.S. District Judge Richard Caputo ruled Friday that Jim Thorpe borough in northeastern Pennsylvania amounts to a museum under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act.