OG&E

StateImpact Oklahoma
3:54 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

U.S. Appeals Court: No New Hearing For Oklahoma In Fight Over EPA Coal Rules

The Grand River Dam Authority's coal-fired plant in Chouteau, Okla., which is impacted by the Regional Haze Rule.
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

A federal appeals court in July ruled the EPA can implement its own plan to limit sulfur dioxide emissions at coal-fired power plants over the state’s plan. Oklahoma Gas & Electric — the state’s largest utility — and state Attorney General Scott Pruitt then asked for another hearing. On Thursday, that request was denied.

In an interview with StateImpact, OG&E spokeswoman Kathleen O’Shea says the next step — if the parties opposed to the EPA regulations continue to take the legal route — would be an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
1:28 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

As One Battle Ends, Another Sparks Between The EPA And OG&E

Oklahoma Gas & Electric's Muskogee Power Plant was part of more than $80 million in renovations done at OG&E coal plants between 2003-2006.
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The clash between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Oklahoma Gas & Electric over pollution from coal-fired power plants continues to escalate.

On Tuesday, Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt and OG&E both asked the 10thU.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reconsider its July decision in favor of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. At issue was whether EPA has the authority to usurp the state’s plan for limiting haze on federal land; a plan EPA has deemed inadequate.

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Environment
10:02 am
Fri August 23, 2013

Why Oklahoma’s Attorney General Is Using Coal To Fight The EPA

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt
Credit Oklahoma Attorney General's Office

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt is no fan of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and filing lawsuits against the federal agency has become a signature of the state’s chief legal adviser.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
1:16 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Sierra Club Sues OG&E, Claims Coal Boiler Mods Violated Federal Clean Air Act

The first page of the Sierra Club's lawsuit against OG&E.
Credit Provided / The Sierra Club

The Sierra Club has filed a lawsuit against Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co., the state’s largest electric utility, alleging the company violated the federal Clean Air Act by modifying a coal burner at its Muskogee power plant without “planning for increased levels of air pollution and failing to obtain a permit from state regulators.”

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StateImpact Oklahoma
8:47 am
Tue July 9, 2013

The EPA Is Suing Oklahoma Gas & Electric Over Its Power Plant Emission Estimates

The first page of the federal government's complaint against OG&E
Credit StateImpact Oklahoma

The federal government on Monday filed a lawsuit against Oklahoma Gas & Electric, accusing the electric utility of violating the Clean Air Act by improperly estimating the amount of emissions that could come from upgrades at two coal-fired power plants.

A copy of the government’s complaint, which was made through the Environmental Protection Agency, is included on StateImpact Oklahoma's website.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
11:47 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Sierra Club Says OG&E Coal Plants Spew Too Much Sulfur Dioxide

Credit Sierra Club of Oklahoma

The Sierra Club on Thursday said two Oklahoma Gas & Electric coal-fired power plants are releasing too much sulfur dioxide, a compound that can cause respiratory disease, which they said endangers residents near Muskogee and Red Rock.

The environmental group commissioned a study that modeled the amount of sulfur dioxide released by the Sooner and Muskogee plants, and says both will violate federal clean air standards — when those standards are implemented.

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10:21 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Why Wyoming Coal Still Powers Natural Gas-Rich Oklahoma

Lead in text: 
Oklahoma has more natural gas reserves than all but three other states. And it now accounts for about 40 percent of the state's power generation.
Hydroelectric and renewable sources- mainly wind - provide some too. But when you flip a light switch, chances are that electricity came from burning coal we get from Wyoming.