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The restored Electric Transformer House at 2412 North Olie Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The latest update of the National Register of Historic Places includes the kinds of Oklahoma buildings you’d expect to be on such a list: a school in Atoka built for black students during the New Deal era, a church in Garfield County barely altered since its construction in 1928, a hotel in Guymon that’s been the tallest building in town for nearly 70 years.

But not all of the properties on the list immediately flash their historic value, like a nondescript one-room brick building in Oklahoma City called the Electric Transformer House.

Oklahoma Gas & Electric's coal-fired Sooner Plant in Red Rock, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Gas and Electric went before the Oklahoma Corporation Commission again this week to try to get approval for environmental upgrades at its coal-fired power plant in Red Rock, Okla.

Tulsa resident Ashley Hacker exits a polling place after casting his vote on a sales tax extension proposal Tuesday.
Rip Stell / The Journal Record

Voters across Oklahoma went to the polls on Tuesday for mostly local elections, including a series of sales tax initiatives in both northeast and central Oklahoma.

In the city of Tulsa, voters approved three separate tax propositions totaling 0.55 percent. They deal with public safety, infrastructure, and capital projects as part of the Vision 2025 program first approved in 2003.

“The tax rate will not go up in Tulsa,” said The Journal Record’s managing editor Adam Brooks. “It’s just extending what they already have and will stay at 8.517 percent.”

Residential electric meters.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Oklahoma Gas and Electric filed a $92.5 million rate case Friday that could bump residential customers' monthly bills by $7.

But the utility says lower natural gas prices would offset the rate hike that would go into effect in June, according to The Oklahoman's Paul Monies:

The Rev. Dr. Bruce Prescott speaks during Tuesday's protest on the steps of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission as other demonstrators hold signs voicing opposition to OG&E's demand charge proposal.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Gas and Electric, the state’s largest electricity utility, wants regulators to approve new fees for customers who install solar panels. The request is now in the hands of Oklahoma’s three-member Corporation Commission, which has to weigh the real cost of reliable electricity and put a fair value on power from the sun.

OG&E's coal-fired power plant in Muskogee.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

This morning the Oklahoma Corporation Commission rejected a plan by the state’s largest utility that could’ve raised monthly utility rates by nearly 20 percent over the next half-decade.

Oklahoma Gas & Electric made the $1.14 billion request in order to pay for upgrades that would put coal-fired power plants in compliance with the federal Clean Air Act.

The Rev. Dr. Bruce Prescott speaks during Tuesday's protest on the steps of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission as other demonstrators hold signs voicing opposition to OG&E's demand charge proposal.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

About 30 demonstrators gathered outside the Oklahoma Corporation Commission on Tuesday.

Holding yellow umbrellas and chanting “Don’t Block The Sun,” the protesters spoke out against a proposal by Oklahoma Gas and Electric to include a demand charge on the bills of rooftop solar customers.

The Grand River Dam Authority's coal-fired plant in Chouteau, Okla., which is impacted by the Regional Haze Rule.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Even before the Obama Administration’s Clean Power Plan was finalized, politicians in Oklahoma were already fighting it in the court of public opinion, and in real court, too. And Gov. Mary Fallin has vowed that Oklahoma will not submit a state compliance plan to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

OG&E's coal-fired power plant in Muskogee.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

On Monday an administrative law judge recommended Oklahoma’s oil, gas, and utility regulator reject several key components of Oklahoma Gas & Electric’s billion-dollar plan to raise rates in order to pay for efforts to comply with Environmental Protection Agency rules.

The Journal Record’s managing editor Adam Brooks says the Oklahoma Corporation Commission has been holding hearings on preapproval of OG&E’s $1.1 billion request. It’s split up into $700 million to get several plants into compliance with the EPA guidelines, plus another $400 million in upgrades to the plant in Mustang west of Oklahoma City. To pay for that, the utility would raise residential and consumer rates by about 19 percent over five years.

OG&E's coal-fired power plant in Muskogee, Okla.
Granger Meador / Flickr

An Oklahoma Corporation Commission Administrative Law Judge recommended state regulators reject several “major portions” of Oklahoma Gas & Electric’s proposal to recover environmental compliance costs.

Oklahoma Gas & Electric's coal-fired Sooner Plant in Red Rock, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

For the past several weeks the Oklahoma Corporation Commission has heard from attorneys for Oklahoma Gas & Electric regarding the utility’s request for approval to spend $1.1 billion.

Oklahoma Gas & Electric's coal-fired Sooner Plant in Red Rock, Okla.
StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Gas and Electric — the state’s largest utility — and Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt fought the EPA’s new Clean Air Act regulations for years before being left with no choice but to comply.

Oklahoma Gas & Electric's coal-fired Sooner Plant in Red Rock, Oklahoma.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Gas and Electric has put up staunch resistance to new federally mandated air pollution rules, joining Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt in taking the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to court over the regional haze and mercury and air toxics rules.

OG&E Power Plant in Muskogee
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Gas & Electric has filed an application with state regulators seeking approval of a plan to put the company in compliance with federal environmental mandates and modernize one of its plants.

The company's Wednesday filing with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission calls for adding two emission control devices to the coal-fired units at the Sooner power plant near Red Rock; converting two coal-fired units at the Muskogee plant to natural gas and modernizing the natural gas units at the Mustang plant.

The improvements are estimated to cost about $1.1 billion.

The Oklahoma Gas and Electric power plant in Muskogee.
Rip Stell / Journal Record

OG&E Says Cleaning Up Emissions At Its Coal-Fired Power Plants Could Cost $1 Billion.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sued the company in 2009, claiming pollution from OG&E creates smog in national parks.  The courts agreed and gave OG&E until 2019 to clean it up.

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