OG&E

Oklahoma Gas & Electric's coal-fired Sooner Plant in Red Rock, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

For the past several weeks the Oklahoma Corporation Commission has heard from attorneys for Oklahoma Gas & Electric regarding the utility’s request for approval to spend $1.1 billion.

Oklahoma Gas & Electric's coal-fired Sooner Plant in Red Rock, Okla.
StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Gas and Electric — the state’s largest utility — and Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt fought the EPA’s new Clean Air Act regulations for years before being left with no choice but to comply.

Oklahoma Gas & Electric's coal-fired Sooner Plant in Red Rock, Oklahoma.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Gas and Electric has put up staunch resistance to new federally mandated air pollution rules, joining Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt in taking the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to court over the regional haze and mercury and air toxics rules.

OG&E Power Plant in Muskogee
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Gas & Electric has filed an application with state regulators seeking approval of a plan to put the company in compliance with federal environmental mandates and modernize one of its plants.

The company's Wednesday filing with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission calls for adding two emission control devices to the coal-fired units at the Sooner power plant near Red Rock; converting two coal-fired units at the Muskogee plant to natural gas and modernizing the natural gas units at the Mustang plant.

The improvements are estimated to cost about $1.1 billion.

The Oklahoma Gas and Electric power plant in Muskogee.
Rip Stell / Journal Record

OG&E Says Cleaning Up Emissions At Its Coal-Fired Power Plants Could Cost $1 Billion.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sued the company in 2009, claiming pollution from OG&E creates smog in national parks.  The courts agreed and gave OG&E until 2019 to clean it up.

Oklahoma Gas & Electric's coal-fired Sooner Plant in Red Rock, Oklahoma.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Gas and Electric — the state’s largest utility — was resistant to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s regional haze rule, which means to clear the air at national parks and wildlife refuges, and was part of a challenge to the rule the U.S.

Oklahoma Gas & Electric's coal-fired Sooner Plant in Red Rock, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Regional Haze Rule is meant to clear the air at national parks and wildlife refuges by reducing emissions from coal-fired power plants.

Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt and Oklahoma Gas and Electric, the state’s largest utility, haven’t had much luck going up against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency lately.

Brian Kusler / Flickr Creative Commons

A legislative measure that would allow electricity utilities to charge higher rates to customers who generate electricity with small solar installations or wind turbines has passed an Oklahoma House committee and now awaits Gov. Mary Fallin’s signature.

Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

A federal appeals court in July ruled the EPA can implement its own plan to limit sulfur dioxide emissions at coal-fired power plants over the state’s plan. Oklahoma Gas & Electric — the state’s largest utility — and state Attorney General Scott Pruitt then asked for another hearing. On Thursday, that request was denied.

In an interview with StateImpact, OG&E spokeswoman Kathleen O’Shea says the next step — if the parties opposed to the EPA regulations continue to take the legal route — would be an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Pages