Former Oklahoma City mayor George Shirk examines an old stove in the Chinese “city” under Oklahoma City, 1969.
Jim Argo / The Oklahoman

For decades, Oklahoma residents have circulated rumors about a vast network of tunnels under downtown Oklahoma city where hundreds of Chinese immigrants lived at the turn of the century.


KGOU listener Gypsy Hogan asked “How Curious:” did those tunnels really exist?

Coming Soon: How Curious

Mar 16, 2018

KGOU’s new podcast is called “How Curious.” Hosted by Claire Donnelly, it explores your questions about Oklahoma. If you have a question for “How Curious," email


Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin delivered her final State of the State address at the Oklahoma Capitol on Feb. 6, 2018.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma


Gov. Mary Fallin: Thank you very much. Lieutenant Gov. Lamb, statewide elected officials, Speaker [Charles] McCall, President Pro Tem Mike Schulz, members of the court, honorable senators and representatives, cabinet members, statewide elected officials, and our tribal leaders that have joined us here today, and most of all, the great citizens of Oklahoma – welcome. It’s good-- to have you all here.

Oklahoma Department of Corrections via AP

A prosecutor who negotiated a plea deal for a man convicted of raping a 13-year-old girl has resigned.  


Murray County Assistant District Attorney David Pyle stepped down Wednesday afternoon, according to a release from the Carter County District Attorney’s office.


The September 27, 2015 "super blood moon."
Casey Davis / NASA

Early-rising Oklahomans will have the chance to view a total lunar eclipse Wednesday morning.


Reveal: A Revealing Year

Jan 1, 2018
In this episode, we look at some of our best reporting from 2017 and how Reveal has made an impact in our world.
Michael I Schiller / Reveal

In this episode, we look at some of our best reporting from 2017 and how Reveal has made an impact in our world.

Our stories covered a lot of ground this year – from the beaches of Bermuda to the politically charged streets of Berkeley, California. And many brought about big changes.

Sue Ogrocki / AP

2017 was a whirlwind year for news all over the world, and Oklahoma was no exception.  Between two special legislative sessions, politicians accused and convicted of sexual misconduct, and investigations into rehab work camps, KGOU and our news partners rarely got a break.  Here's a look back at our top local stories of the year, featuring contributions from the Journal Record, Oklahoma Watch, StateImpact Oklahoma and Reveal and KGOU.

Federal Bureau of Investigation

Oklahoma law enforcement agencies were among hundreds who participated in a nationwide investigation into underage human trafficking.  

The Federal Bureau of Investigation conducted Operation Cross Country XI last week, working in hotels, casinos, truck stops and street corners, as well as on the internet. Law enforcement recovered 84 minors and arrested 120 traffickers across the United States.

Juggalos from Fredericksburg, VA sell Insane Clown Posse merchandise outside their RV
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

Thousands of fans of the hip hop music duo Insane Clown Posse are convening at Oklahoma City’s Lost Lakes Amphitheater this week for the annual music festival known as the “Gathering of the Juggalos.”

Tennis court at Lions Park in Norman, Oklahoma
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

This week's summer sound features tennis instructor Frank Berry. It was recorded at Lions Park in Norman. 

pellcan / Flickr Creative Commons

This week's summer sound features Gypsy Hogan. It was recorded in Hogan's backyard in northeast Oklahoma City. 

Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter is suing more than a dozen U.S. drug manufacturers.

Jake's Fireworks in Logan County, Oklahoma
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

This week’s summer sound features Marcella Meade. It was recorded at Jake's Fireworks north of Edmond. 

Will Rogers Aquatic Center in Oklahoma City
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

This week’s summer sound features Dakotan Jackson, Kendrell Fox and Lennox Buchanan. It was recorded at Will Rogers Aquatic Center in Oklahoma City.


Woman types on a laptop
Ed Gregory / Pexels

Life in a military family is full of intersections. The spouses of service men and women sometimes connect with each other for just a short time before they must move to a new base or even a new country. Social media is a vital resource for these people to create relationships and maintain them over long distances.

Oklahoma State University economist Dan Rickman
Oklahoma State University

Oklahoma will continue to see job growth in 2015, even if lower energy prices slow those increases, Oklahoma State University economist Dan Rickman said Tuesday.

Speaking at the 2015 Oklahoma Economic Outlook Conference, which is hosted by the OSU Center for Applied Economic Research at the university’s Spears School of Business, Rickman forecast over 30,000 jobs will be added to the Oklahoma workforce during the 12-month period beginning Jan. 1.

The majority of the jobs, he said, are expected to be in administrative and support services and durable goods manufacturing. More than 5,000 new jobs are projected to be created in each sector, according to Rickman.

Emily Soreghan

The idea of local, sustainable food isn't new. It's pretty much the only way early settlers on the Oklahoma prairie didn't starve to death.

But in the 21st century, everything from home gardens, to restaurants, to huge organic agribusinesses help pass the practices, and the connection between the land and the food that comes from it, to future generations.

Katie Shauberger’s yard has two small garden plots, which she showed me on a cool September night. Katie is a senior at The University of Oklahoma and an avid gardener who has many reasons for growing her own food

Four state universities offer new programs to make college education more affordable. OU, OSU, Langston University, and USAO have moved to a flat-rate tuition, where students pay one rate regardless of hours taken. OU has also launched a debt-free teacher initiative, in which the school will forgive up to $20,000 in student loan debt if a student agrees to teach in Oklahoma for at least 4 years.

A Mental Health Mission Goes Statewide

Aug 24, 2014
Michael Brose, Executive Director of the Mental Health Association of Oklahoma.
Angela Chambers / Oklahoma Watch

Growing up in Kansas near the Oklahoma Panhandle, Michael Brose saw firsthand the struggles of rural residents to find quality health care.

Later, in two decades as executive director of the Mental Health Association in Tulsa, Brose observed similar problems with urban residents’ access to affordable care for mental illness and substance abuse.

Today, Brose is using his experience in those two settings to carry out a new, broader mission for his advocacy organization. In April, the Mental Health Association in Tulsa renamed itself the Mental Health Association Oklahoma. That change occurred after the Mental Health Association of Central Oklahoma in Oklahoma City closed its doors.

MHA Oklahoma, based in Tulsa, is now the state’s most prominent nonprofit to focus on mental health services beyond the local level. The need is great: Oklahoma’s rate of mental illness ranks among the highest in the nation, and funding for health services is limited.

In an interview with Oklahoma Watch, Brose discussed the association’s plans for expansion; efforts to help the homeless, teens and veterans, and how to prevent suicide. The interview has been edited and condensed.

You now lead an organization for the entire state. Does that mean you will be offering your services for the mentally ill in every part of Oklahoma?

It’s a step-by-step approach. We’ve always served the Tulsa metro area. The next step is to develop systems that will primarily be targeting Oklahoma City and central Oklahoma areas that will include Norman. I spoke and met with people in Stillwater not too long ago. Ultimately, we want to serve the whole state. Before the expansion, we consulted and worked with contacts in central Oklahoma and around the state in rural areas. We’ve become a member of the United Way of Central Oklahoma, so we’re members of both United Ways (Tulsa and Central Oklahoma).

One of the most exciting things about expanding in other parts of the state is meeting people. We’re all Oklahomans and have similar needs. We’ve had this long history of this dichotomy between Oklahoma City and Tulsa, and we’re really about doing our part to break down those barriers.

The death chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester.
Oklahoma Department of Corrections

A federal judge has scheduled a hearing for next month in a lawsuit filed by a group of death row inmates over Oklahoma's execution procedures.

U.S. District Judge Stephen Friot on Tuesday scheduled a hearing for Sept. 18 in the case, which was filed by 21 inmates following the April 29 botched execution of Clayton Lockett. The inmates are trying to halt any attempt to execute them using the state's current lethal injection protocols.