KGOU

oklahoma city

katsrcool / Flickr.com

Oklahoma has finalized a deal with a Massachusetts company to use license-plate scanners to catch uninsured drivers, and the firm expects to issue 20,000 citations a month starting as early as next year.

The program, believed to be the first of its kind in the nation, involves setting up automated high-speed cameras on highways around the state to detect uninsured vehicles and mailing their owners a citation with a fine of $184, according to the District Attorneys Council.

StickWare / Flickr

One week after federal Election Day, Oklahomans headed to the polls to vote in local races in more than 30 counties, including three special elections to fill vacant seats in the legislature.  The results came in late Tuesday night.

Republican Paul Rosino won the seat of former State Senator Kyle Loveless in District 45, which includes parts of Canadian, Cleveland and Oklahoma Counties. Rosino beat Democrat Steven Vincent with 57 percent of the vote.

Nomin Ujiyediin / KGOU

A cyclops, a sea monster and a three-headed dog guard the office of Scott Henderson, a gallery director at the Science Museum Oklahoma.

Jerry Gutierrez steers his golf cart on a tour of his ranch near the Kiamichi River in southeastern Oklahoma. Gutierrez and other nearby residents urged the state not to approve Oklahoma City's permit to tap water from river.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma City’s decades-long quest for a permit to pump water out of southeastern Oklahoma is over. This week, state regulators approved a key part of the city’s $1 billion-plus project to meet the metro’s long-term water needs, but residents and water rights groups say the urban victory marks a milestone — not the end of the road.

Oklahoma City has water storage rights at Sardis Lake in southeastern Oklahoma. To get it, the city plans to divert water that flows from the lake into the Kiamichi River and pump it more than a hundred miles northwest to the metro.

Artist Kris Kanaly installs his contribution to Not for Sale: Graffiti Culture in Oklahoma.
Nomin Ujiyediin / KGOU

Like a lot of graffiti writers, Kris Kanaly started young. First, by doodling a tag name, “P-nut,” when he was six years old. Then, by picking up cans of spray paint in the ditch near his childhood home in Oklahoma City. He eventually settled on an alias he still uses to this day: RHAK.

It’s the name he chose to spray paint on a wall in the Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center on Sunday night. The letters are outlined in yellow, orange, blue and gray. They look like they’re stepping off the wall.

The Oklahoma County Jail.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Local government has taken another step to improve cooperation between law enforcement and conditions in the Oklahoma County Jail.

Jerry Drake Varnell
Facebook

An Oklahoma man was arrested Saturday morning in connection with an attempt to detonate what he believed was a vehicle bomb in Oklahoma City.

Oklahoma activists and residents gather outside the State Capitol Building to show solidarity with Charlottesville, Virginia.
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

More than 200 residents and activists gathered at the Oklahoma State Capitol Sunday evening to demonstrate solidarity in the wake of the deadly events in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Olivia and Carter Kempen playing on a splash pad in Edmond, Oklahoma.
Zoe Travers / StateImpact Oklahoma

People who live in Oklahoma know the state’s weather is hard to predict. Erratic rain, heat and ice, and drought can also devastate government budgets. To combat this, researchers from the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University are using new software to help cities predict these economic strains.

Juggalos from Fredericksburg, VA sell Insane Clown Posse merchandise outside their RV
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

Thousands of fans of the hip hop music duo Insane Clown Posse are convening at Oklahoma City’s Lost Lakes Amphitheater this week for the annual music festival known as the “Gathering of the Juggalos.”

A flight arrives at the Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City on Nov. 15, 2016.
Storme Jones / KGOU

Frontier Airlines is returning to Oklahoma City’s Will Rogers Airport.

Oklahoma City Council

The Oklahoma City Council approved an agreement Tuesday to help finance a convention hotel with $85.4 million in public funding.

Oklahoma state capitol
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Billions of dollars in Oklahoma state funds are reserved for education, revolving funds and other costs.  Called "apportionments," these allotments are beyond the reach of legislators and can't be changed.

General Electric's new Oil and Gas Technology Center in Oklahoma City.
Victor A. Pozadas

A new report from the Brookings Institution says Oklahoma City is positioned for growth. It says the city has a solid layer of infrastructure that is essential for development — and diversifying the economy. But there’s a threat to this development, and that’s a potentially weak workforce. Some researchers say local officials need to ensure schools provide the training innovative companies need. And they need to be doing it now.

Storme Jones / KGOU

The Scissortail Park will be the newest project to join the MAPS 3 series of renovations.

Community leaders announced the name Thursday at a groundbreaking ceremony.

The annual Oklahoma City Pride Parade celebrated its 30th anniversary on June 25, 2017.
Nomin Ujiyediin / KGOU

Thousands of supporters attended Oklahoma City's 30th annual Pride Parade on Sunday, June 25. The parade was the climax of the weekend-long OKC Pride Festival, which celebrated LGBT life in Oklahoma and featured music, activist organizations, vendors and local charities. Check out KGOU's photos of the celebration above.

Matthew Rutledge / Flickr.com

A one-night survey of homelessness in Oklahoma City shows overall homelessness rates are down by nearly 10 percent. However, survey organizers say not all of the results show signs of improvement.

Photograph used for a newspaper owned by the Oklahoma Publishing Company. Caption: "First Parking Meter"
Oklahoma Historical Society

The Oklahoma City City Council is considering replacing most of the city’s coin-operated parking meters, but losing them means losing part of the city’s history.

On the 22nd anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing, roses, wreaths and teddy bears decorated chairs representing the children killed at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building on April 19, 1995. There are 168 chairs in total—one for each adult and child w
Nomin Ujiyediin / KGOU

It’s been more than two decades since a truck full of explosives destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City, killing 168 people and injuring hundreds more.

Charlette Hearne at the North Pole Store, near Broken Bow, Okla.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The lakes and streams of southeast Oklahoma are vital to the area’s economy, and Broken Bow resident Charlette Hearne has made it her mission to stand in the way of attempts to move water out of her part of the state.

It’s Christmas season in North Pole, Okla., a blip on the map near Broken Bow. No one’s sure how this community along State Highway 3 got that name, but Charlette Hearne embraces the community at her North Pole convenience store, and holiday decorations abound. Hearne is from Colorado, but fell in love with Broken Bow Lake back in the 1970s.

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