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oklahoma city

The Oklahoma County Jail.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Local government has taken another step to improve cooperation between law enforcement and conditions in the Oklahoma County Jail.

Jerry Drake Varnell
Facebook

An Oklahoma man was arrested Saturday morning in connection with an attempt to detonate what he believed was a vehicle bomb in Oklahoma City.

Oklahoma activists and residents gather outside the State Capitol Building to show solidarity with Charlottesville, Virginia.
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

More than 200 residents and activists gathered at the Oklahoma State Capitol Sunday evening to demonstrate solidarity in the wake of the deadly events in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Olivia and Carter Kempen playing on a splash pad in Edmond, Oklahoma.
Zoe Travers / StateImpact Oklahoma

People who live in Oklahoma know the state’s weather is hard to predict. Erratic rain, heat and ice, and drought can also devastate government budgets. To combat this, researchers from the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University are using new software to help cities predict these economic strains.

Juggalos from Fredericksburg, VA sell Insane Clown Posse merchandise outside their RV
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

Thousands of fans of the hip hop music duo Insane Clown Posse are convening at Oklahoma City’s Lost Lakes Amphitheater this week for the annual music festival known as the “Gathering of the Juggalos.”

A flight arrives at the Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City on Nov. 15, 2016.
Storme Jones / KGOU

Frontier Airlines is returning to Oklahoma City’s Will Rogers Airport.

Oklahoma City Council

The Oklahoma City Council approved an agreement Tuesday to help finance a convention hotel with $85.4 million in public funding.

Oklahoma state capitol
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Billions of dollars in Oklahoma state funds are reserved for education, revolving funds and other costs.  Called "apportionments," these allotments are beyond the reach of legislators and can't be changed.

General Electric's new Oil and Gas Technology Center in Oklahoma City.
Victor A. Pozadas

A new report from the Brookings Institution says Oklahoma City is positioned for growth. It says the city has a solid layer of infrastructure that is essential for development — and diversifying the economy. But there’s a threat to this development, and that’s a potentially weak workforce. Some researchers say local officials need to ensure schools provide the training innovative companies need. And they need to be doing it now.

Storme Jones / KGOU

The Scissortail Park will be the newest project to join the MAPS 3 series of renovations.

Community leaders announced the name Thursday at a groundbreaking ceremony.

The annual Oklahoma City Pride Parade celebrated its 30th anniversary on June 25, 2017.
Nomin Ujiyediin / KGOU

Thousands of supporters attended Oklahoma City's 30th annual Pride Parade on Sunday, June 25. The parade was the climax of the weekend-long OKC Pride Festival, which celebrated LGBT life in Oklahoma and featured music, activist organizations, vendors and local charities. Check out KGOU's photos of the celebration above.

Matthew Rutledge / Flickr.com

A one-night survey of homelessness in Oklahoma City shows overall homelessness rates are down by nearly 10 percent. However, survey organizers say not all of the results show signs of improvement.

Photograph used for a newspaper owned by the Oklahoma Publishing Company. Caption: "First Parking Meter"
Oklahoma Historical Society

The Oklahoma City City Council is considering replacing most of the city’s coin-operated parking meters, but losing them means losing part of the city’s history.

On the 22nd anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing, roses, wreaths and teddy bears decorated chairs representing the children killed at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building on April 19, 1995. There are 168 chairs in total—one for each adult and child w
Nomin Ujiyediin / KGOU

It’s been more than two decades since a truck full of explosives destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City, killing 168 people and injuring hundreds more.

Charlette Hearne at the North Pole Store, near Broken Bow, Okla.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The lakes and streams of southeast Oklahoma are vital to the area’s economy, and Broken Bow resident Charlette Hearne has made it her mission to stand in the way of attempts to move water out of her part of the state.

It’s Christmas season in North Pole, Okla., a blip on the map near Broken Bow. No one’s sure how this community along State Highway 3 got that name, but Charlette Hearne embraces the community at her North Pole convenience store, and holiday decorations abound. Hearne is from Colorado, but fell in love with Broken Bow Lake back in the 1970s.

Workers maneuver heavy machinery on the site of new construction at Main Street and Hudson Avenue in downtown Oklahoma City Tuesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City developers only have a few days left to file their projects at City Hall before new impact fees go into effect.

The fees will produce about $8.7 million per year toward infrastructure projects, and The Journal Record's Brian Brus reports the timing coincides with a projected tax revenue shortfall that's prompted mid-fiscal-year-job cuts and across-the-board budget tightening:

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett listens to a slideshow presentation on the city’s MAPS projects during a special session of the Oklahoma City Council Tuesday at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Earlier this week the Oklahoma City Council met for a special session at the Cox Convention Center in downtown Oklahoma City to discuss the general obligation bond to pay for city government that will go before voters in 2017.

The GE Global Research Center in Oklahoma City.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Over the next week City Council members will consider adding a new tax increment finance, or TIF, district to Oklahoma City.

Raul Font is president of the Latino Community Development Agency in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Immigration dominated the 2016 presidential election, with promises from President-elect Donald Trump to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico, and a clampdown on undocumented migrants from both Latin America and the Middle East.

Mass deportations could have a significant affect on Oklahoma City’s economy, especially south Oklahoma City, where there’s a significant Hispanic population.

A man enters the Skirvin Hilton Hotel in downtown Oklahoma City Tuesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Tuesday, the City of Oklahoma City announced hotel/motel tax collections fell for the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2017, and were down even below the most conservative estimates.

The so-called “tourist tax” was down 5.9 percent compared to FY 16, but 2.7 percent below estimates. The Journal Record’s editor Ted Streuli says the effect was felt city-wide, but the downturn really differs based on geography.

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