KGOU

Oklahoma City police

Juggalos from Fredericksburg, VA sell Insane Clown Posse merchandise outside their RV
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

Thousands of fans of the hip hop music duo Insane Clown Posse are convening at Oklahoma City’s Lost Lakes Amphitheater this week for the annual music festival known as the “Gathering of the Juggalos.”

Oklahoma City Police Chief Bill Citty
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma City’s police union, the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 123, is pushing the city’s police department to put more officers on the streets.

Oklahoma City Police Chief Bill Citty
Sue Ogrocki / AP

The Oklahoma City Police Department and the city’s Fraternal Order of Police have reached an agreement over the use of body worn cameras. The new agreement spells out when the cameras can, and must, be used.

Officers will be required to turn on cameras in the time between receiving a call and arriving at the scene. Police cannot roll film when interviewing victims or witnesses. Police management will be able to watch film to review operations, but not necessarily to assess an individual officer’s performance unless a citizen files a complaint.

Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Updated Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Oklahoma City police say the suspect in a shooting Tuesday at the Will Rogers World Airport was a former employee at Southwest Airlines, and resigned his position in April 2015.

Police allege 45-year-old Lloyd Dean Buie shot and killed Michael Winchester on Tuesday shortly before 1:00 p.m. in the airport parking lot. Winchester was leaving work when Buie allegedly shot him with a rifle from a range of approximately 50 yards.

Winchester also worked at Southwest Airlines.

Sgt. Rob Gallavan loads his department-issued rifle into his patrol car trunk on Aug. 1, 2016
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

A string of violent attacks across the country has many cops on high alert. And now, some departments are arming officers with more powerful gear. In Oklahoma City, that means police can soon start carrying personally owned rifles on duty, a decision that’s leading the department to find a balance between gearing up and preserving community relations.

'No longer rare'

It’s police sergeant Rob Gallavan’s day off. There’s a large black bag sitting on his kitchen table. He unzips it and casually removes a solid black, department-issued firearm.

Two women join hands with Oklahoma City police officers to pray during a Black Lives Matter rally in Oklahoma City, Sunday, July 10, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Organizers of Sunday's Black Lives Matter rally in Bricktown praised Oklahoma City police for their response and restraint during the event. Oklahoma City officers mostly provided security, and at one point created a perimeter between the activists and counter-protesters across the street.

"I’ll be honest, they have been absolutely great,” said Karen Gaines, one of the event’s three primary organizers. “They have been tremendously helpful, just all the way around. They’ve asked us if we needed anything. They were very supportive actually.”

Oklahoma City Police Chief Bill Citty
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma City Chief of Police Bill Citty offered his condolences to Dallas police following the deadly attack that killed five officers and injured several others at a peaceful Black Lives Matter demonstration Thursday.

 

Speaking in front of a wall honoring fallen officers at the Oklahoma City Police Department Headquarters, Citty said the department has not received any specific threats ahead of a Black Lives Matter protest in Oklahoma City Sunday evening. 

 

The Oklahoma City Police Department's Honor Guard, 2015.
Oklahoma City Police Department / Wikimedia CC0 1.0

A large, phone-book type document.

That's how Mayor Mick Cornett described the proposed Oklahoma City budget for Fiscal Year 2017 unveiled during the city council meeting Tuesday morning.

The budget presentation begins at 24:00 into the meeting

In All Cases, Police Find No Proof Of Racial Profiling

Dec 19, 2015
Daran Steele, of northeast Oklahoma City, alleges that two police officers improperly detained and frisked him in 2013 because he is black.
Nate Robson, Oklahoma Watch / YouTube

Over a four-year period, Oklahoma’s two largest police departments and two state agencies received about 60 complaints alleging unlawful racial profiling by officers.

Investigators substantiated none of the allegations, according to data obtained by Oklahoma Watch.

All of the complaints were probed by the law enforcement agencies against whom the complaints were filed, but investigators found insufficient evidence that officers had treated the person differently because of race or ethnicity.

(L-R): Oklahoma Watch executive editor David Fritze, Oklahoma City Ward 7 councilman John Pettis, Jr., and Oklahoma City police chief Bill Citty during Tuesday night's forum at Kamp's 1910 Café.
Patrick Roberts / KGOU

Oklahoma City residents crowded into a café in Midtown last month to discuss police and minority communities.

The event hosted by Oklahoma Watch raised questions about diversity within the police force.

Oklahoma City Ward 7 councilman John Pettis, Jr. spoke to the crowd about everything from the nationwide spike in police shootings to the racial makeup of the city’s police force, where the number of black officers stands at roughly 6 percent. Pettis voiced concerns that number would drop even lower in coming years as minority officers begin to retire.

Oklahoma City Police Car
Paul L. McCord Jr. / Flickr Creative Commons

The Oklahoma City Council on Tuesday approved policies for body-worn cameras for the city’s police department. 

The program begins with a three-system “wear test,” and then Oklahoma City police will deploy 100 body-worn cameras for a yearlong trial program.

At the council meeting Tuesday, Chief of Police Bill Citty said the cameras provide an opportunity to improve transparency and confidence in policing procedures.

Pixabay

Oklahoma police have shot and killed more people per capita this year than any other state in the nation. In Oklahoma City, fatal officer-involved shootings are on the rise as well, and that’s causing some to question officer training.

In July, four Oklahoma City police officers arrived at a house in the northeast part of the city. They were looking for Andre Williams. Williams was a registered sex offender with a lengthy record, and he had allegedly just raped a woman.

Police Use Of Force Incidents On The Rise In Oklahoma City

Aug 31, 2015
Tony Webster / Flickr

Oklahoma leads the nation in the number of police killings per capita so far this year, according to an analysis by The Guardian.

Oklahoma City police have been a part of seven fatal officer-involved shootings, which is more than any other department in the state in 2015. Officers from the police department in Tulsa -- the state’s second largest city -- haven’t shot and killed anyone in 2015, despite a higher violent crime rate.

Pixabay

Oklahoma City's police chief says new guidelines outlining the types of video footage open for public records will pave the way for the use of body cameras in Oklahoma's largest city.

The new law permits the release of body camera videos but allows certain exemptions. Videos containing death are exempt from release, unless the death was caused by law enforcement.

Oklahoma City Police Car
Paul L. McCord Jr. / Flickr Creative Commons

Oklahoma City police will take part in a pilot program in which officers will wear body cameras.

Police Chief Bill Citty says 100 cameras will be used by officers on patrol for one year. The program will then be evaluated to determine if an how the cameras would be used by all the city's officers.

The cameras are worn on a patrol officer's body and the officer turns the camera on during an encounter such as a traffic stop or an investigation. The video is then stored as evidence.

Oklahoma City Police Car
Paul L. McCord Jr. / Flickr Creative Commons

Residents of a neighborhood where an Oklahoma City officer is accused of sexually assaulting women say the allegations make them distrust police.

Investigators say 27-year-old Daniel Ken Holtzclaw raped one woman and either fondled others or forced them to expose themselves.

Police say the women were all black and between the ages of 34 and 58, but it's not clear if race played a role in the alleged crimes.

Resident Tammy Bell said Saturday the officer was "taking advantage of his shield."