Oklahoma Department of Education

Gov. Mary Fallin and legislative leaders announced an agreement on Wednesday to help state schools and prisons avoid additional mid-year cuts. The state will withdraw $51 million from the Rainy Day Fund for the Department of Education and another $27.5 million for the Department of Corrections.

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Joy Hofmeister announces a pilot program to pay for ACT exams for all Oklahoma 11th graders - August 19, 2015.
Oklahoma State Department of Education / Twitter

The State Department of Education wants more Oklahoma kids to go to college, so it’s launching a pilot program that would make it easier for all students to apply.

This year, high school juniors in the state won’t have to pay to take the ACT college entrance exam because the Department of Education is picking up the tab.

Gov. Mary Fallin / Facebook

Oklahoma educators plan to rally to renew demands made at a massive Capitol demonstration a year ago for more classroom funding and better salaries.

This time, they will have a new ally in Superintendent of Public Instruction Joy Hofmeister. The former public school teacher and ex-state Board of Education member plans to add her voice to the thousands of teachers, school administrators and parents expected at the March 30 gathering.

The Republican defeated former state Schools Superintendent Janet Barresi in the GOP primary.

Joy Hofmeister, Oklahoma State Schools Superintendent
Provided

New Superintendent of Public Instruction Joy Hofmeister has named a longtime educator from the Oklahoma City area as the first person to take a leadership position in her administration.

Hofmeister said Thursday that Robyn Miller will oversee policy research and development as well as teacher quality initiatives for the state Department of Education.

Miller comes to the agency from Oklahoma Christian University in Edmond, where she has served as chair of the School of Education since 2007.

woodleywonderworks / Flickr Creative Commons

A new report finds Oklahoma is near the bottom of the list nationally on the quality of education it provides to students.

Education Week’s “Quality Counts” report card, released Thursday, ranked Oklahoma’s education system 48th out of the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

The annual report, which changed this year to focus more on educational outcomes, looked at academic achievement, school funding and the chance for success students have when they grow up.

State Schools Superintendent Janet Barresi speaks about the federal government's denial of an NCLB waiver extension.
Nate Robson / Oklahoma Watch

Oklahoma's school's superintendent says miscalculations in the state's school funding formula since 1992 will soon cause a number of mid-year adjustments worth millions of dollars.

The Tulsa World reported Friday a Ponca City school official had noted that a state law caps agricultural and commercial personal property taxes at 11 percent. State Superintendent Janet Barresi said the cap has not been in place.

timlewisnm / Flickr Creative Commons

The Oklahoma Board of Education is expected to consider a sole-source contract with a testing vendor to conduct about 50,000 end-of-instruction tests for high school students this winter.

The board is holding a special meeting Friday in Oklahoma City to consider a contract with Measured Progress to conduct the testing. State Department of Education officials say the contract will be for between $3.3 million and $3.5 million.

In Education, Do Parents Matter?

Oct 15, 2014
Nate Robson / Oklahoma Watch

At John Marshall High School in Oklahoma City, only 22 percent of parents attended a parent-teacher conference in 2012-2013, state records show.

In Tulsa, just 4 percent of parents at Central Junior High School made at least one parent-teacher meeting – the lowest rate in the district.

Oklahoma Policy Institute

  

Education is a core service of Oklahoma’s state government, is woefully underfunded, and will cost the state future jobs if not addressed soon.

That’s the message of some panelists convened by the Oklahoma Policy Institute last month, which discussed Oklahoma’s burgeoning fiscal challenges.

Serge Melki / Flickr.com

An Oklahoma district judge has ruled that a portion of a scholarship program for students with disabilities that's funded with state money is unconstitutional.

The judge ruled Thursday that funds from the Lindsey Nicole Henry Scholarship Program cannot be used to send students to sectarian schools. The judge also stayed the order pending an appeal — meaning the program remains unchanged for the time being.

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt says he will appeal the ruling.

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