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oklahoma legislature

FILE- Oklahoma State Capitol
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

As the Oklahoma legislature wraps up its sixth week in special session, only one bill has made it to Governor Mary Fallin’s desk. The House of Representatives and Senate passed a bill to appropriate $23.3 million from the state’s “rainy day fund” for the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services.

 

 

Oklahoma state capitol
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Will the Oklahoma Legislature get behind a cigarette tax in the upcoming special session?

Capitol Insider

Jul 3, 2017
State of Oklahoma

This is the Manager’s Minute.

The legislative session is over, but there’s still a lot to talk about coming from the state capitol.

Legal challenges may lead to a rare special session.

State budget cuts have forced agencies to change the way they operate and the services they provide.

And, campaigns are already starting for statewide elections in 2018.

So, to help you stay informed about Oklahoma government and politics, we invite you to listen each week to the Capitol Insider with eCapitol news director Shawn Ashley.

Oklahoma State Senate

Two bills that would require stricter oversight of various state tax credits and incentives have cleared a Senate committee.

The Senate Finance Committee approved both bills by Senate President Pro Tem Brian Bingman on Tuesday. The measures now proceed to the full Senate.

Oklahoma House of Representatives Chamber
http://www.oklegislature.gov/

Oklahoma lawmakers will have more than 2,000 bills and resolutions to consider when they convene next month.

Thursday afternoon was the deadline for filing bills to be considered by the 2015 Oklahoma Legislature. Legislative officials say 1,219 bills and 26 joint resolutions were filed in the House. A total of 815 bills and 32 joint resolutions were filed in the state Senate by the deadline.

Oklahoma House of Representatives Chamber
http://www.oklegislature.gov/

Oklahoma legislators are filing bills for consideration from several directions. There is no indication which of these will be seriously consider, among the over 230 bills filed so far.

The proposed legislation ranges from a prohibition for agency heads leaving office from hiring new employees, to a screening of emergency patients waiting to be transported by EMS teams to determine if they are not stable enough to be transported.

Another draft bill would allow victims of domestic violence to bring forth evidence from other relevant cases to a proposal to eliminate four government agencies.

One proposed law would prevent a family member or caretaker convicted of neglect, abuse, exploitation or other crimes against an “elderly” or disabled person from inheriting from the victim or receiving any portion of their estate. Another draft law would allow teachers to exempt from taxes 25% of their income.

Other bills include a prohibition against lasers if they are pointed at airplanes, a proposal to eliminate the state senate to create a unicameral legislature, a ban on texting while driving, allowing multi-religious symbols in schools for winter celebrations, and allowing legislators to carry firearms after a CLEET course.

Oklahoma State Capitol
LLudo / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Now that the dust has settled at the state Capitol after the May 23 end of the 2014 Oklahoma legislative session, journalists, lobbyists and the public will try to figure out what the legislature did (or didn’t) accomplish as lawmakers shift their focus to a contentious primary season ahead of June 24.

The Oklahoma Senate
Becky McCray / Flickr Creative Commons

From the start of the legislative session on February 3rd, StateImpact Oklahoma had its eye on what was sure to be a heated issue: the coming expiration of a tax credit for horizontally drilled oil and gas wells. Without action, rates would go from one-percent for the first four years of a well’s life, back to 7 percent.

Oklahoma Lawmakers’ Salaries Set For Review

Oct 1, 2013
KellyK / Flickr Creative Commons

The Board on Legislative Compensation will review state lawmakers’ salaries in October.

Oklahoma is one of 19 states with compensation commissions designed to “…provide independent and impartial recommendations” on lawmakers’ pay, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL).