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Oklahoma News

The Enid News & Eagle, with a circulation of 10,000, lost 162 subscribers who canceled the paper. Eleven advertisers pulled their ads, including a funeral home that had a sizable account. Someone stuck a “Crooked Hillary” bumper sticker on the glass doors of the paper’s downtown office. A man left a late-night message on the publisher’s voice mail, expressing his hope that readers would deliver, to put it delicately, a burning sack of steaming excrement to the paper.

The 2016 presidential election, contests for contentious state questions, and curiously, alcohol infused with a breakfast staple dominated KGOU’s digital coverage this year. From Oklahoma’s Congressional delegation’s reaction to Hillary Clinton’s emails, to energy industry layoffs, to agriculture and capital punishment, there were plenty of stories for our newsroom to tell in 2016.

A video showing University Oklahoma running back Joe Mixon punching a female student was released to The Associated Press and other media outlets Friday.

The Oklahoma Supreme Court ordered the release last week of a video that the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters sued to obtain.

The Associated Press acquired videos showing two angles of the incident. One, which shows the altercation, is the video the OAB sued for. The other shows another angle of the incident.

Oklahoma City Fire Chief Keith Bryant speaks on the phone in his office Tuesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City and the union representing the city’s firefighters have come to a last-minute agreement on the department’s contract. The International Association of Firefighters Local 157 says accepting the decision saves taxpayers an unnecessary expense.

Several months have passed since an independent arbitration sided with the fire department, but City Hall thought about fighting back, and considered calling a public vote on the union’s contract.

Art Rutledge looks over a shipment of liquor at Vice Spirits, Wine, Beer at 317 N. Walker Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The Retail Liquor Association of Oklahoma is finalizing legal action it promised to take after the passage of State Question 792 in November.

The ballot initiative would change the state's laws to allow wine and cold beer to be sold in grocery and convenience stores, starting in 2018. The Retail Liquor Association’s attorney Ann Gervais Richard told The Journal Record's Molly Fleming the lawsuit could come in the next few weeks:

A recent court filing says the Tulsa Police Department's policy on the use of deadly force is unconstitutional.

In November 2014, Nathan Boyd was in the middle of a mental health episode when police officers approached his vehicle, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

Josh Gwartney, principal of the early childhood center at Chouteau-Mazie Public Schools, displays the paddle available to be used on students.
Clifton Adcock / Oklahoma Watch

All schools should stop paddling students as a form of discipline because it’s “harmful, ineffective, and often disproportionately applied to students of color and students with disabilities,” U.S. Secretary of Education John King wrote in a letter Tuesday to all state governors and schools chiefs.

The Nestle Purina plant at 13900 N. Lincoln Blvd. in Edmond.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Union workers in Edmond are suing their boss, and the fight started over tardy employees.

Two years ago, the Nestle Purina pet food manufacturing plant started a new attendance policy. If workers were late or didn’t show up, they would lose points.

The union eventually won an arbitration that showed Nestle Purina violated the employees’ bargaining agreement and also committed unfair labor practices, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

Storme Jones / KGOU

More than 100 students, faculty, and staff members gathered on the University of Oklahoma's South Oval Wednesday in opposition to an anti-Black Lives Matter and anti-Islamic protest. OU President David Boren ordered the group to leave campus, or face arrest.

A small group of so-called street preachers have come to the campus before. This time, the group took aim at sensitive issues around the country, holding signs reading “BLM Are Racist Thugs” and “Muhammad is the devil.”  

Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Updated Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Oklahoma City police say the suspect in a shooting Tuesday at the Will Rogers World Airport was a former employee at Southwest Airlines, and resigned his position in April 2015.

Police allege 45-year-old Lloyd Dean Buie shot and killed Michael Winchester on Tuesday shortly before 1:00 p.m. in the airport parking lot. Winchester was leaving work when Buie allegedly shot him with a rifle from a range of approximately 50 yards.

Winchester also worked at Southwest Airlines.

A supporter of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at the Oklahoma Republican Party's watch party at Main Event in Oklahoma City
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

There were few surprises at the national level as Oklahoma voters overwhelmingly chose Republican nominee Donald Trump to become the 45th president of the United States.

A line forms outside the Crown Heights Christian Church in Oklahoma City shortly after 8 a.m. on Election Day.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Polls opened at 7 a.m. across Oklahoma, and the State Election Board says nearly 1,000 extra pollworkers are manning precincts today. Several polling places throughout the metro had long lines, with some voters waiting for anywhere from an hour to 90 minutes Tuesday morning.

McAlester's 4th Ward councilman Robert Karr stands in front of his home in Oct. 2016
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

After finishing up work at the airplane manufacturing plant where Robert Karr has worked for more than three decades, the McAlester city councilman drives his pickup truck around the town's 4th ward. Karr has lived in this area almost his entire life, save for six years when his family moved out of town.

 

His 4th ward roots are deep, and Karr knows his constituents well.

Earthquake damage in downtown Cushing after a 5.0 magnitude temblor struck the city November 6, 2016
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

A 5.0 magnitude earthquake struck Sunday night near the city of Cushing, damaging buildings, knocking out power, and forcing the evacuation of an assisted living center.

Updated 9:33 a.m.

One injury has been reported and 40-50 buildings sustained substantial damage, primarily near downtown Cushing.

Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater speaks to the Board of County Commissioners on Nov. 2.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Oklahoma County's Board of County Commissioners met Wednesday morning and discussed last month’s investigatory audit of the Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office, but ultimately voted to defer a decision until next week. The deferment means a decision regarding Sheriff John Whetsel’s tenure will not be made until after the Nov. 8 election, where Whetsel is seeking re-election for a sixth term.

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