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Oklahoma News

Nichols Hills City Hall under construction in 1970.
D. Heaton / Oklahoma Publishing Company Photography Collection, Oklahoam Historical Society

The City of Nichols Hills takes up approximately two square miles within the Oklahoma City city limits. It's home to about 3,700 people.

 

KGOU listener Marcella Meade asked “How Curious:” where did the name Nichols Hills come from?

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Police Sgt. Jeff Crawford is breaking his routine. He’s leaving the office and climbing into his squad car because Oklahoma City Public Schools teachers and supporters are rallying at the state Capitol to demand more school funding.

Crawford is a school resource officer who normally works out of Douglass Mid-High School. He has left his post temporarily to check on elementary schools and community centers in eastern Oklahoma City that are feeding kids who depend on the meals they get in school.

Angler Billy Nabors catches a state record 98 pound blue catfish with a rod and line in Lake Texoma, November 2004.
Oklahoma Department of Wildlife / wildlifedepartment.com

A catfish the size of a bus lurking in the deep waters of Lake Texoma, with eyes as big as a Volkswagen Beetle’s headlights.

 

Steven Neal heard this rumor and asked “How Curious:” Is it true?

 

Former Oklahoma City mayor George Shirk examines an old stove in the Chinese “city” under Oklahoma City, 1969.
Jim Argo / The Oklahoman

For decades, Oklahoma residents have circulated rumors about a vast network of tunnels under downtown Oklahoma city where hundreds of Chinese immigrants lived at the turn of the century.

 

KGOU listener Gypsy Hogan asked “How Curious:” did those tunnels really exist?

Oklahoma Department of Corrections

The colorless, odorless gas makes up 78 percent of our air.

Yet it is used in some assisted suicides in Europe. It is touted by some advocates for industry euthanasia of animals. And the gas – nitrogen – is what U.S. Air Force pilots are exposed to during high-altitude tests that gauge their reaction to reduced oxygen and can render them unconscious.

Now Oklahoma plans to use nitrogen in its death-penalty chamber.

 

Storme Jones / KGOU

More than 400 students at Norman High School walked out of class to protest gun violence on Wednesday morning, joining thousands of young protesters from across the country, one month after a mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida.

Nomin Ujiyediin / KGOU

In December 2017, the Oklahoma State Department of Health announced it would be laying off 161 staff members on March 3. Eleven staffers have since quit or retired, leaving 150 people who lost their jobs at the end of the day on Friday, according to an OSDH spokesman.

Elaine Thompson / AP Images

Every year, Oklahoma state lawmakers propose legislation to make carrying guns easier and push back on attempts to constrain gun ownership.

Yet nationally, firearms and momentum for stricter gun control continue to be high-profile issues that draw widespread attention after each mass shooting, whether in Nevada, Texas or Florida.

RepLankford / Flickr Public Domain

United States lawmakers are in recess this week after failing to pass three approaches to making the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program permanent. The DACA program protects from deportation immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

Jeff Raymond / Oklahoma Watch

Lawmakers are right back where they started after a much-anticipated vote to pass one of the largest tax increases in state history fell short in the state House.

Despite business luminaries and hundreds of educators filling the Capitol in support of the Step Up Oklahoma Plan, the revenue-raising proposal only received 63 votes, which was 13 votes shy of passing the constitutionally required three-fourths threshold for revenue-raising bills.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin delivered her final State of the State address at the Oklahoma Capitol on Feb. 6, 2018.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

FULL TRANSCRIPT: 

Gov. Mary Fallin: Thank you very much. Lieutenant Gov. Lamb, statewide elected officials, Speaker [Charles] McCall, President Pro Tem Mike Schulz, members of the court, honorable senators and representatives, cabinet members, statewide elected officials, and our tribal leaders that have joined us here today, and most of all, the great citizens of Oklahoma – welcome. It’s good-- to have you all here.

The September 27, 2015 "super blood moon."
Casey Davis / NASA

Early-rising Oklahomans will have the chance to view a total lunar eclipse Wednesday morning.

 

Oklahoma Corporation Commission

Federal and state authorities are investigating the cause of the deadly explosion and fire at a natural gas drilling rig in southeastern Oklahoma on Monday. 

Kids from a local youth organization laugh and splash in cold, spring-fed pools at the Chickasaw National Recreation Area near Sulphur, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The offices of most federal agencies in Oklahoma could be affected by a potential government shutdown, if the U.S. Senate fails to move past a deadlock on a funding bill.

prison bars
mikecogh / Flickr Creative Commons

Oklahoma has one in eight inmates who are serving a life sentence or a sentence of at least 50 years, a new report using 2016 data shows.

A broad-based coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders are the latest group to offer a specific plan to end the state’s ongoing budget impasse.

The proposal is sweeping and dramatic, and is backed by some of the most prominent and powerful industry interests in the state. Whether it will fly with legislators and citizens remains to be seen.

Paul L. McCord, Jr. / Flickr.com

The NBA season is about halfway over and the Oklahoma City Thunder are not performing as well as fans had hoped.

 

KGOU's Claire Donnelly spoke with Jon Hamm, who writes about the Thunder for Bleacher Report and co-hosts the Thunder podcast OKC Dream Team, about the team's struggles, playoff chances and more.  

 

Sue Ogrocki / AP

2017 was a whirlwind year for news all over the world, and Oklahoma was no exception.  Between two special legislative sessions, politicians accused and convicted of sexual misconduct, and investigations into rehab work camps, KGOU and our news partners rarely got a break.  Here's a look back at our top local stories of the year, featuring contributions from the Journal Record, Oklahoma Watch, StateImpact Oklahoma and Reveal and KGOU.

Nomin Ujiyediin / KGOU

In anticipation of a Norman City Council vote to rename a street named after a deceased Ku Klux Klan member, a city councilwoman says she’ll cover the costs of the renaming herself.

Ward 6 Councilwoman Breea Clark is planning to start a GoFundMe to pay for administrative fees associated with renaming DeBarr Avenue, as well as new street signs. She also hopes to pay for other costs, like updating residents’ driver’s licenses, legal documents and checkbooks, if she raises enough funds.

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