Oklahoma News

Mick Cornett, Chair, U.S. Conference of Mayors and Mayor of Oklahoma City speaks during the opening day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Monday, July 18, 2016.
Mark J. Terrill / AP

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett described success by GOP municipal leaders during the first day of the Republican National Convention Monday afternoon in Cleveland.

Cornett said Republicans hold the top jobs from San Diego to Miami, including Oklahoma’s two largest cities. He said Republicans have held the Oklahoma City mayor’s seat for 29 consecutive years.

Charmian Conrad writes the day’s specials on a chalkboard at Pump Bar in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The Oklahoma Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission ruled Friday that bars and restaurants can infuse drinks with vegetables, fruits, spices, and even cured meats. Members reached the decision without much discussion.

The ruling came after the owner of The Pump in Oklahoma City asked for an ABLE ruling following the arrest of his bar manager for having bacon strips inside a vodka bottle.

Workers repair a road in Oklahoma City, July 9, 2014.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Mayor Mick Cornett says the next iteration of the MAPS sales tax could be used to repair crumbling infrastructure in Oklahoma City, but reiterated it likely won’t come this year.
Voters will consider renewing Oklahoma City's general obligation bond in 2017, and a street development impact fee will also take effect.

Oklahoma’s multicounty grand jury has indicted a regent for the Regional University System of Oklahoma who’s also a former state lawmaker and rural electric cooperative CEO.

Terry Matlock faces 11 counts of embezzlement and one count of engaging in a pattern of criminal offenses. He’s accused of using Choctaw Electric Cooperative employees for work on his property, and using company funds for agriculture equipment, The Oklahoman’s Kyle Schwab reports:

Two women join hands with Oklahoma City police officers to pray during a Black Lives Matter rally in Oklahoma City, Sunday, July 10, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Organizers of Sunday's Black Lives Matter rally in Bricktown praised Oklahoma City police for their response and restraint during the event. Oklahoma City officers mostly provided security, and at one point created a perimeter between the activists and counter-protesters across the street.

"I’ll be honest, they have been absolutely great,” said Karen Gaines, one of the event’s three primary organizers. “They have been tremendously helpful, just all the way around. They’ve asked us if we needed anything. They were very supportive actually.”

More than 1,000 demonstrators march down the Walnut Ave. bridge in Bricktown during Sunday evening's Black Lives Matter protest.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Members of the Black Lives Matter movement marched in downtown Oklahoma City on Sunday to call for policing reform.

Protesters chanted “We come in peace,” “What do we want? Justice,” and “Black lives matter,” as they filled up the pavilion in front of the Harkins Theatre in Bricktown. Along the way, some stopped to share a hug or handshake with on duty Oklahoma City police officers. The demonstration was peaceful, and speakers called for systemic changes for how police interact with minority communities.

Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

More than one thousand people marched through downtown Oklahoma City for a protest against the treatment of African-Americans by law enforcement, and to honor the five officers killed Thursday in Dallas.

The group gathered just north of Bricktown and marched down the Walnut Ave. bridge past the Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark and assembled near the fountain in front of the Harkins Theatre.

Gov. Mary Fallin has ordered Oklahoma and American flags flown at half-staff on all state property through Wednesday morning.

Oklahoma's elected officials and city leaders were quick to condemn Thursday night's sniper attacks in its southern neighbor. Dallas is just over a three hours drive south of Oklahoma City. U.S. Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.), who grew up in Dallas and attended the University of Texas at Austin, met with police officers in Guthrie Friday afternoon.

The restored Electric Transformer House at 2412 North Olie Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The latest update of the National Register of Historic Places includes the kinds of Oklahoma buildings you’d expect to be on such a list: a school in Atoka built for black students during the New Deal era, a church in Garfield County barely altered since its construction in 1928, a hotel in Guymon that’s been the tallest building in town for nearly 70 years.

But not all of the properties on the list immediately flash their historic value, like a nondescript one-room brick building in Oklahoma City called the Electric Transformer House.

Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Oklahoma’s Department of Corrections begins moving inmates Tuesday to a newly leased private facility in far western Oklahoma, where state employees will run the prison. The agreement between the state and Corrections Corporation of America is a first in Oklahoma’s prison system.

 

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