Oklahoma News

Oklahoma News
6:18 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Gov. Fallin Signs 'Right To Try' Bill and 56 Others

Gov. Mary Fallin
Credit facebook

Gov. Mary Fallin has signed legislation that makes Oklahoma the 15th state in the nation to permit terminally ill patients to have access to experimental medications and procedures that are being used in clinical trials but are not yet on pharmacy shelves.

The measure, known as the Right to Try Act, was among 57 bills Fallin signed into law Tuesday.

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Oklahoma News
3:22 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

House-Senate Conference Committee To Take Up Open Records Bill

Oklahoma Capitol Building
Credit ana branca / Flickr Creative Commons

The Oklahoma Senate has approved Open Records Act legislation that would limit access by the public and media to audio and video recordings obtained from equipment attached to a law enforcement officer or vehicle.

The Senate voted 46-0 for the House-passed bill Tuesday and sent it to a joint House-Senate conference committee for more work. Its Senate author, Republican Sen. David Holt of Bethany, says lawmakers are working with law enforcement and media representatives to fashion the bill's final form.

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OKC Bombing: 20 Years Later
10:03 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Air Force Sergeant Stood In Police Lineup With Timothy McVeigh

Air Force senior master sergeant Gary Kirby stood in a police lineup with Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh in 1995.
Credit Jacob McCleland / KGOU

It was supposed to be Gary Kirby’s day off when the senior airman in the United States Air Force got a call from his first sergeant. The request: Come back to Tinker Air Force Base dressed in a pair of blue jeans, a white t-shirt and white socks.

Kirby, now a senior master sergeant, showed up at the headquarters building to find a big, blue Air Force bus. He climbed on board, where he found between 40 and 50 guys --- and all of them looked like him.

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Oklahoma News
6:10 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

State Lawmakers To Introduce Reserve Police Training Requirements Bill

State Rep. Mike Christian (R-OKC)
Credit okhouse.gov

A group of Oklahoma legislators say they plan to introduce a bill that will require more law enforcement training for volunteer officers following the shooting death of an unarmed man in Tulsa by a 73-year-old reserve deputy.

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Oklahoma News
5:01 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Gov. Fallin Signs Asbestos Cleanup Bill

Oklahoma Secretary of Energy and Environment Michael Teague, left, and Oklahoma Labor Commissioner Mark Costello witness Governor Mary Fallin sign Senate Bill 658.
Credit Provided

Gov. Mary Fallin has signed into law a bill she says clarifies the state Department of Labor's role in asbestos removal projects in buildings and structures.

The measure signed Monday eliminates language related to asbestos abatement in private and public facilities. It clarifies that the Department of Labor is the primary authority for asbestos abatement on job sites.

In addition, the agency has signed a cooperative agreement with the Department of Environmental Quality clarifying jurisdictional authorities in asbestos cleanup projects.

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Oklahoma News
12:27 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Tulsa County Sheriff Says Robert Bates' Training Records Were Not Falsified

Tulsa County Sheriff Stanley Glanz
Credit tcso.org

The Tulsa County sheriff says he doesn't believe training records were falsified in connection to a volunteer deputy who fatally shot a man after mistaking his handgun for a stun gun.

Sheriff Stanley Glanz said Monday he's known the volunteer, insurance executive Robert Bates, for about 25 years.

Bates is charged with second-degree manslaughter in the death of Eric Harris, who was shot after running from officers during a sting investigation.

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OKC Bombing: 20 Years Later
10:28 am
Mon April 20, 2015

Legacy Of The Oklahoma City Bombing

The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building on May 19, 1995, exactly one month after the bombing. It was demolished four days later.
Than217 Wikimedia Commons

What does the Oklahoma City bombing mean now, two decades later? Will the memory and meaning of April 19, 1995, gradually recede into a distant echo?

That's hard to believe as one considers the extensive observances and media coverage this month. The grief and shock of what happened are as palpable as ever: On a sunny Wednesday morning, a terrorist bomb ripped apart the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, killing 168 men, women and children. Those who saw it will never forget the black smoke rising in the sky, the bloody images of the  injured, and the wreckage of the  building marring the downtown skyline.

This multimedia story, including a video and a podcast, revolves around a question: What has changed because of the bombing? Oklahoma Watch spoke with several experts or leaders about their views on the impact of the worst act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history.

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Oklahoma News
7:29 am
Mon April 20, 2015

Attorneys Release Sheriff's Deputy Training Records, Protesters Want Sheriff To Resign

Attorneys for Robert Bates released some of the training records Saturday for the 73-year-old volunteer sheriff's deputy charged with manslaughter in the fatal shooting of an unarmed suspect in Tulsa.

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OKC Bombing: 20 Years Later
7:34 am
Sun April 19, 2015

State, Nation Pause To Remember 168 Victims Killed In The Oklahoma City Bombing

Family members and friends of Oklahoma City bombing victims gathered at the Oklahoma City National Memorial to commemorate the bombing's 20th anniversary.
Jacob McCleland KGOU

Updated 10:31 a.m.: Ceremony concludes as dignitaries, survivors reflect

As rain started to fall on the Oklahoma City National Memorial Sunday morning, former President Bill Clinton delivered powerful remarks that drew a standing ovation from the thousands who gathered to mark the 20th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing.

"For a whole country, you burned away all the petty squabbles in which we engage, leaving only our basic humanity. I mostly came here to thank you today," Clinton said.

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Oklahoma News
3:43 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Governor Fallin Signs Bill Allowing Nitrogen Hypoxia Executions

The death chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester.
Credit Oklahoma Department of Corrections

Governor Mary Fallin signed into law a bill Friday expanding the options for future executions. The new procedure uses an inert gas and will replace lethal injections should the Supreme Court of the United States rule the state’s current protocol unconstitutional.  

The process replaces an inmate’s available oxygen with nitrogen through a mask or bag placed over the face.

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