Oklahoma Water Resources Board

StateImpact Oklahoma
2:58 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

Gov. Rick Perry Misses Legislative Deadline In Oklahoma-Texas Border Dispute

Credit Paul L. McCord, Jr. / Flickr Creative Commons

Exactly where the border between Oklahoma and Texas lies along the Red River has never been completely clear, especially where Lake Texoma covers the original river shore.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
1:07 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Few Oklahoma Cities Filter Water For Element That Causes Toxic Algae In Lakes

Credit Lake Improvement Association / Flickr Creative Commons

There’s too much phosphorous in the vast majority of Oklahoma’s lakes and streams.

Excessive phosphorous and nitrogen leads to blue-green algae blooms, which can cause respiratory, eye, and stomach problems in people, and fish kills due to lack of oxygen.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
9:19 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Texas’ Application For Oklahoma Water Still Active Despite Supreme Court Ruling

Credit Mark Fischer / Flickr Creative Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court in June sided with Oklahoma, ruling the interstate Red River water compact did not entitle Texas to water within Oklahoma’s borders.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
12:31 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

After Decade Of Consideration, State Caps Withdrawals From Oklahoma’s Most Sensitive Aquifer

A larger than usual crowd packs the OWRB's monthly meeting in Midwest City to hear the board vote Wednesday afternoon.
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Supporters let out a big cheer Wednesday after the Oklahoma Water Resources Board voted to cap the amount of water that can be taken from the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, the source of drinking water for communities across a large area of south-central Oklahoma.

The decision was 10 years in the making, and came about — in part — because some landowners were concerned that limestone and sand mining was draining the aquifer too quickly.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
3:23 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Despite State Assistance, Water Problems Worsening in Konawa

Justin Johnson, a wastewater treatment plant operator in Konawa, OK, stands near some of the town's water wells in December 2012.
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Many of the 1,500 or so residents of Konawa, in Seminole County, are once again without water as the town continues to grapple with the ongoing breakdown of the pipes, mains, and pumps that deliver water to homes and businesses.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
12:31 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

OKC’s Tab For Tapping Sardis Water Could Be $1 Billion

Sardis Lake
Credit Olliehigh / Flickr Creative Commons

Oklahoma City already depends on water from southeastern Oklahoma, but the 60-inch, 100-mile pipeline from Lake Atoka ain’t enough.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
2:49 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

The Federal Cost Of Clean Drinking Water In Oklahoma: $6.5 Billion

The Vendome Well at the Chickasaw National Recreation Area in Sulphur, Okla.
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Every four years, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency releases an analysis of how much federal money states will need to complete water projects to provide clean drinking water over the next 20 years.

The most recent update of the EPA’s Drinking Water Infrastructure Needs Survey and Assessment was just released, and the national need is staggering:

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StateImpact Oklahoma
2:47 pm
Tue June 4, 2013

Gov. Fallin Signs Law Giving Oklahoma Water Regulator Regional Representation

Water advocacy groups praised the new law, saying it it would give a bigger planning voice to rural areas, especially water-rich southeastern Oklahoma.
Credit Joe Wertz / The Oklahoma Water Resources Board is a big advocate for regional water planning, the idea that local control over who uses what water and where it’s sent will lead to better conservation. But the move toward regional planning signed into law Friday by G

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board is a big advocate for regional water planning, the idea that local control over who uses what water and where it’s sent will lead to better conservation.

But the move toward regional planning signed into law Friday by Gov. Mary Fallin isn’t exactly what the board had in mind.

“We had nothing to do with this bill,” OWRB Executive Director J.D. Strong says.

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