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Lisa Davis (right) with the advocacy group Save Lake Texoma near the Rooster Creek Bridge at Lake Texoma State Park.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

On Wednesday, April 30, StateImpact Oklahoma presents an important conversation on how the changing climate will affect Oklahoma.

Guests will include Clay Pope, the Executive Director of the Oklahoma Association of Conservation Districts, and David Engle, the Executive Director of Oklahoma State University's Water Resources Center.

Jessica Lothrop / Flickr Creative Commons

Supporters of gay marriage in Oklahoma are praising a decision by the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down a provision of a federal law denying federal benefits to married gay couples.

But opponents of same-sex marriages also found a silver lining in Wednesday's ruling, saying Oklahoma's constitutional ban on gay marriage remains intact.

Governor Mary Fallin issued a statement Wednesday saying that like "the vast majority of Oklahomans," she supports traditional marriage.

Cailey Dougherty

Although the United States is a popular destination for exchange students around the world, not all exchange students choose to study in Oklahoma. Adrian Guarrera (University of Nice, France) and Rich Dawson (University of Sheffield, England) about their first time experience in the Sooner State.

Dawson: My first time in Oklahoma was crazy, y’all.

Guarrera: My first time in Oklahoma was definitely unforgettable.

Dawson: We’ve been here since August of last year on an exchange year and we’re going to be leaving in like 3 weeks.

Steinbeck, Oklahoma Can Get Along

Apr 22, 2013
University of Oklahoma

John Steinbeck does not often rise to the list of universally revered authors among Oklahomans. His book, The Grapes of Wrath, is widely viewed as presenting a negative view of the state's residents.

But University of Oklahoma history professor David Wrobel says the state's reputation has not been cursed by the book.

Abortion Restriction Bill Passes House

Mar 12, 2013

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A pair of bills that make it more difficult for girls younger than 18 to have an abortion without notifying their parents have easily cleared the Oklahoma House.

The House on Tuesday approved the bills that would limit the ability of teenage girls to have a judge allow them to get an abortion without parental consent.

The first bill by Democratic Rep. Rebecca Hamilton of Oklahoma City would require parental notification in all cases, except for medical emergencies or if the girl was a victim of sexual or physical abuse by a parent. It passed 80-12.

Residents Pay Widely Ranging Rates for Water

Mar 12, 2013

You turn the tap and out comes water, but what does it cost? It's a common resource that is priced in ways that may be surprising.

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