KGOU

Pakistan

Nyla Ali Khan
Jim Johnson / KGOU

More than a year after the death of a popular young militant, Kashmir’s youth are seeking independence and using social media to urge change.

Viewing India's Partition Through Bollywood

Aug 14, 2017

Pakistan and India are marking 70 years since they won their independence from British rule in 1947. That’s when the countries were also partitioned into two — a bloody time that led millions to flee their homes and left as many as 1 million people dead.

At least 126 people are dead after the Taliban targeted a school in Peshawar that is run by the Pakistani military. Six militants, including a suicide bomber, attacked the school.

A Taliban spokesman told the BBC it was in direct response to an offensive against the Taliban in North Waziristan that has killed hundreds of Taliban fighters.

The BBC’s Shahzeb Jilani joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson from Karachi, Pakistan, with details.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the so-called "Umbrella Revolution" protests in Hong Kong , and the closing arguments in the Bosnian war crimes trial of Radovan Karadžić in The Hague.

Later, a conversation with University of Waterloo political scientist Mariam Mufti. She studies electoral and party politics in South Asia, as well as democratization and regime change.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Navy Adm. Mike Mullen reviews Pakistani troops during a ceremony honoring Mullen's arrival to Islamabad, Pakistan, Feb. 9, 2008.
Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Chad J. McNeeley, U.S. Navy / Wikimedia Commons

In 1947, the Indian subcontinent gained independence from the United Kingdom and split into three states: the Muslim majority countries of East and West Pakistan and the Hindu majority country of India.

“This is very important for us to understand,” says University of Waterloo professor Mariam Mufti. “Because subsequently all of Pakistan's actions on the international community have been driven by this foreign policy that was very India-centric.”

Suzette Grillot talks with University of Oklahoma junior Amanda Tomlinson about the speech in Arabic she gave at the United Nations General Assembly this summer and the importance of multilingualism.

Later in the program, an interview with Pakistani actor Iqbal Theba about his role on the TV show Glee, and the role of race in the entertainment industry.

Iqbal Theba addresses University of Oklahoma students in April 2014.
CISSnapshot / Tumblr

When Iqbal Theba arrived at the University of Oklahoma from Pakistan in the early 1980s, he planned to become a construction manager. Instead, Theba became one of the most prominent South Asian actors in the United States.

Best known for his role as Principal Figgins on the hit series Glee, Theba has appeared in dozens of television shows, commercials, and movies, including Community and ER.

He discovered his love for acting when he went to see an OU friend perform in a play.

World Views: February 14, 2014

Feb 14, 2014

Suzette Grillot hosts the program from Puebla, Mexico, and shares her thoughts on the colonial city with University of Oklahoma Spanish literature historian Luis Cortest.

Later, a conversation with Pakistan analysts and scholars Joshua White and Shamyla Chaudry about how the country's burgeoning, educated youth population and how various religious and militant groups pose distinct policy concerns for the South Asian nuclear power and the United States.

Spc. Stephen J. Schmitz / U.S. Army / Flickr Creative Commons

Pakistan’s burgeoning, educated youth population and various religious and militant groups pose distinct policy concerns for the South Asian nuclear power and the United States, say analysts and scholars Joshua White and Shamyla Chaudry.

The indictment Tuesday of former Pakistani President and army chief Pervez Musharraf on murder charges connected to the 2007 assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto is an unprecedented exercise of power by a civilian court in a country long dominated by the nation's military, NPR's Abdul Sattar reports from Islamabad.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the cargo ship stopped in Panama on its way to North Korea with missiles and fighter jets on board, and Pakistani women’s education activist Malala Yousafzai’s speech before the United Nations.

Sanam Naraghi-Anderlini, the co-founder of the International Civil Society Action Network (ICAN), joins Grillot and Cruise for a conversation about gender and security in the 13 years since the adoption of UN Security Council Resolution 1325.

Eskinder Debebe / UN Photo

Earlier this week Pakistani Taliban commander Adnan Rasheed wrote a letter to 16-year-old women’s education activist Malala Yousafzai saying he wished the October 2012 attack on her life hadn’t happened.

The letter came shortly after Yousafzai’s July 12 speech before the United Nations, where she said the attack gave her a renewed sense of strength, power and courage.

“The attack on her was not in response to her support for girls' education, but because she was critical of the Taliban,” says Suzette Grillot, the Dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies. “He encourages her to come back to Pakistan and pick up her pen in the name of Islam.”

On Tuesday the U.N. General Assembly approved a treaty to regulate the global arms trade, and the panel explores what role the CIA is playing in Arab and Turkish military aid to Syria.

Ambassador Cynthia Schneider joins Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis to discuss how culture influenced her diplomacy while representing the United States in the Netherlands between 1998 and 2001.

Focus Features / NBCUniversal

While serving as the U.S. Ambassador to the Netherlands in 2001, Cynthia Schneider used Hollywood to approach sensitive drug issues between American and Dutch officials.

Schneider invited embassy staffers focusing on drugs, and their counterparts in the Dutch Ministry of Justice, to a screening of Steven Soderbergh’s Oscar-winning film Traffic.

“It's a very powerful film that shows the intricacies of drug trafficking, and really shows how complicated it is,” Schneider says. “That was a fantastic experience because it kind of leveled the playing ground, and after seeing that film together we were able to have the most honest, direct conversation that we ever had, and really make progress.”