KGOU

Parker Millsap

Parker Millsap performs at The Deli in Norman, Oklahoma on September 1, 2015.
Jim Whiteley / Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

"It's not the end of the world" is a thing people say to place inconveniences in perspective, a reminder that a rush-hour fender bender doesn't belong to the same category of catastrophe as nuclear or biblical apocalypse.

Parker Millsap has a voice that grabs you and doesn't let go. The musician is just 23, from a small town in Oklahoma — but the songs on his newest album, The Very Last Day, draw on older influences, including Greek mythology, vintage blues and his own Pentecostal upbringing.

Millsap spoke with NPR's Melissa Block about learning how to sing without being self-conscious, as well as channeling a childhood fear of the biblical rapture into his work. Hear the radio version at the audio link and read an edited version of their conversation below.

Duke Robillard

On this week’s OneSix8, I bring you a summer jazz festival, a Shakespearian play set in Vienna, Virginia in 1969, and a panel discussion with an award-winning author and photographer. Let’s get started.

When Jazz in June first started in 1984, it drew 300 people. Thirty years later, the annual festival plans to attract over 50,000 people. Jazz enthusiasts can hear musicians like Oklahoma native Parker Millsap as well as renowned guitarist Duke Robillard June 20 – 22 at Andrews Park, Brookhaven Village, and the Performing Arts Studio in Norman.