Donald Trump held a kickoff event for his South Carolina campaign on Tuesday, and his speech was, to put it mildly, a doozy. Speaking in Sun City, S.C., without the aid of a TelePrompTer — because "Maybe when you run for president you shouldn't be allowed to use a TelePrompTer, because you find out what you're getting" — he was defensive, brash, angry, funny and self-aggrandizing.

Margo Wright / Wikimedia Commons

A group of women who have held public office in Oklahoma say it is important for more women to become involved in politics.

At a meeting of the Norman Chamber of Commerce on Friday, the women set aside politics to underscore the need to add women's opinions and viewpoints to the public debate.

Former Lt. Gov. Jari Askins says state decisions that impact families need to have a female perspective.

State Rep. Leslie Osborn says there is no glass ceiling at the Legislature, but that not enough women are running for office.

Study: Statehouse Press Corps In Decline

Jul 11, 2014

A declining number of reporters are stalking the hallways of the nation's statehouses.

That's according to a Pew Research report released Thursday. The study found that the number of full-time statehouse newspaper reporters declined by more than a third between 2003 and 2014. There are now just 164 full-time newspaper journalists reporting on the bills, protests and politicians in the nation's 50 state capitals.

Media Plays Part In U.S. Political Polarization

Nov 4, 2013

The political polarization of the United States continues to capture the attention of politicians and political observers. University of Oklahoma President David Boren calls the problem, “one of the most serious threats to America’s influence at home and abroad.”

Happy Halloween, fellow political junkies.

It was predictable that President Obama would face more political tricks than treats as a re-elected president than he did as a new one if only because, unlike his first term, he started his second with a Republican House largely hostile to him and his agenda.

Good morning, fellow political junkies.

It's the last week of October. That means the administration has just a month to meet its self-imposed deadline to have the Affordable Care Act website running as efficiently as it and millions of Americans had originally envisioned.

But the first item in our Monday political mix of some of the more interesting tidbits that caught my eye this morning indicates why setting such a deadline might be easier than meeting it.

Good morning.

Your erstwhile members of Congress are high-tailing it out of Washington for the weekend (no votes in the House, and the Senate took the day off but promises to return Monday).

But there's plenty to digest.

Fallout from Thursday's House hearing on computer problems marring the health care overhaul rollout. Across-the-pond anger over America's spying on allies. And, yes, donkeys. We'll get to that.

Amanda Northrup would never do it again.

She's dated Democrats in the past, but she found their acceptance of abortion heartbreaking and their support of President Obama nearly as off-putting.

"He was going off to celebrate Obama becoming president, and I felt betrayed and like he didn't understand me," recalls Northrup, who is 30 and works in real estate in Chattanooga, Tenn. "I think that's why eventually the two can't be together. It's such a big difference."

Federal Workers Question Congressman Over Sequester

Apr 1, 2013
House Republican Conference

Several federal employees questioned 5th Distrcit U.S. Rep. James Lankford (R-Okla.) on pay cuts they’re forced to take as part of sequestration during a town hall recorded last month by KGOU.

Delo Anderson wanted to know why Congress isn’t letting the Dept. of Defense make strategic decisions on how to implement mandatory budget cuts, forcing 800,000 defense workers to take 22 furlough days.

“I met with Leon Panetta last summer to ask about sequestration,” Lankford said. “His response was we are not going to plan for it; it’s not going to happen.”

Despite What You Think, Civil Discourse Exists

Mar 18, 2013
Protocol Photography / Flickr Creative Commons

It doesn’t take very long, scanning through the cable news channels and talk radio, to assume that civil discourse is hard to come by in the United States.

On this episode of Oklahoma Voices, we hear from two speakers at a recent conference sponsored by Phillips Theological Seminary in Tulsa who present evidence we’re not as divided as it may appear.